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Columns

  • Champions offers variety of activities to children in school, community groups

    Buses are loaded up, lunchboxes are packed and students have returned to schools in Carroll County. At Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County we are geared up and excited for a fun-filled year, with education and prevention at our forefront as always.

    We are excited to offer Carroll County students an array of hands-on, fun and simultaneously educational school-based clubs and activities all year round.

  • Training consortium scholarship opened doors for local student

    I am very thankful for my scholarship and co-op opportunities.

    Near the end of my high school career, I received a full scholarship from the Carroll County Training Consortium to attend Jefferson Community and Technical College in Carrollton, Ky. This was only the beginning of great opportunities for me.

    Three days after I graduated from Trimble County High School, I started a summer job at the Kentucky Utilities Power Plant in Ghent, Ky.

    I worked throughout the summer full-time painting and cleaning inside and out of the building.

  • Pick a ‘safe word’ for your family

    “Your mother was involved in an accident, she asked me to pick you up and take you to the hospital to meet her.”

    How many of us have children that wouldn’t hesitate to go with a stranger if they were told something like this. I would suggest a safe word. The safe word would be known only by you and your child or children.

  • School Smiles returns to Carroll in September

    School Smiles is once again providing in-school dental care to students in the Carroll County School District.

    Similar to last year, School Smiles will be sending a licensed dentist, a licensed dental hygienist and a dental assistant to each school in the district in September. Forms have been sent home with students, but parents may contact any school in the district to access the forms as well.

    School Smiles will visit Kathryn Winn on Sept. 5 and 12, Cartmell on Sept. 29, Carroll County Middle School on Sept. 12 and Carroll County High School on Sept. 30.

  • Kentucky plays key role in the nation’s medical advances

    Several weeks ago, Kentucky received international attention when we learned that an Owensboro facility was the home of an experimental serum given to two Americans who had become infected with the Ebola virus in Africa.

    While more work is necessary to determine the treatment’s effectiveness, it nonetheless speaks well of our state that we can play a leading role in tackling what has been called the world’s worst outbreak of this disease.

    What makes this treatment unique is that it was produced using a plant Kentucky knows well: tobacco.

  • Community support provides for programs

    We have all heard the saying, “It takes a village to raise a child.” I think that applies to raising great children and raising a great community.  This year the library had one of it’s most successful Summer Reading Program, with more than 2,000 people attending events for families and children in the months of June and July. 

  • Frustrations build over the political gridlock in nation

    Frankfort State Journal

    When we look at the political gridlock in our nation’s capital — and to an extent in our own capital — as citizens and taxpayers we’re reminded of the story told by the late Southern comedian Jerry Clower (1926-98). It went something like this:

    While walking in the woods, two men encountered a wildcat on the trail. One of the men began to run and found a tree to climb. The wildcat gave chase and went right on up after him.

  • Transportation proves a key to the economy in Kentucky

    Over the last several weeks, there has been renewed discussion about two of Kentucky’s oldest forms of transportation: rivers and railroads.

    Late last month, the General Assembly’s Budget Review Subcommittee on Transportation dedicated part of its monthly meeting to learn more about the central role Kentucky plays when it comes to barge traffic.

  • DNA advances aid in researching ancestry

    Last month, I attended the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh, or GRIP, for a weeklong course in using DNA to aid in family history research.

    It was fascinating.

    It turns out that genetic genealogists are the driving force behind breakthroughs in DNA testing and tools to help analyze data, which can answer all sorts of questions that come up when researching a family tree.

  • Manage poultry parasite risks to avoid problems with fowl

    For poultry owners, scouting for parasites is an important management practice for the flock. Let us take a closer look at a variety of parasites that can attack poultry by either sucking blood or feeding on skin and feathers.

    Northern fowl mite:  The most common external parasites in chickens, turkeys, game birds, pigeons etc. are northern fowl mites. Spread through bird contact, signs of infestation depend on severity.  Chickens may lose weight, exhibit decreased feed intake and egg production, or become anemic.