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Columns

  • Lessons learned on a Kentucky dairy farm

    By SAM TERRY

    Barren County Progress

    Reading about the massive changes in America’s dairy industry caused me to reflect on my own dairy farm upbringing and a way of life that is fast becoming a thing of the past. Southern Kentucky has been the prime area for Kentucky’s dairy farmers for generations but driving through the area reveals that family farms, particularly those centered around dairy cattle and tobacco, are few and far between. Dairy farming has been a time-honored vocation that taught many of us valuable lessons in preparation for life.

  • Champions’ town hall May 24, to focus on meth

    On Thursday, May 24, Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County will be hosting our annual Carroll County Town Forum Meeting at General Butler State Resort Park Convention Center starting at 6 p.m.

  • Growing our economy with hemp

    For far too long, the federal government has prevented most farmers from growing hemp. Although it was a foundational part of Kentucky’s heritage and today you can buy products made with hemp at stores across the country, most farmers have been barred from planting it in their fields. I have heard from many Kentucky farmers who agree it’s time to remove the federal hurdles in place and give our state the opportunity to seize its full potential and once again become the national leader for hemp production.

  • Many new laws won approval during the legislative session

    When historians look back on the 2018 legislative session, most of their attention will understandably be focused on three things: the state’s budget, the corresponding tax plan and public-pension reform. They didn’t generate every headline, but there’s no doubt they accounted for most.

  • Rand voted ‘no’ on state budget bill

    As legislators were debating Friday night whether to give final approval to a major revenue bill, someone brought up the old joke about how most of us would prefer to fund government: Don’t tax you, don’t tax me; tax that fellow behind the tree.

  • Choosing words wisely seems to be a lost art

    By MIKE CALDWELL

    The Advocate-Messenger

    You could argue this is the biggest understatement of all time, but here it is: Language is important.

    Word choice and tone can make all the difference. How we say something is often just as critical as what we say.

    That seems to be somewhat of a lost concept in today’s world of 280-character tweets, status updates on the hour and attention-seeking sound bites.

  • Your best years are ahead. Invest wisely.

    The most frequent question I’m asked when telling someone what I do for a living is, “What is the best thing for me to invest in?” It’s as if they are looking for a great stock tip that is going to catapult them into instant wealth. Unfortunately, these opportunities are rare and usually pure luck when they do occur. Your co-worker’s story of a friend of a neighbor who instantly went from rags to riches is probably heavily embellished with little to no fact.

  • Want to clean up the county? Marsh explains county’s nuisance policy

    If you have not noticed, the election season is upon us. The same old indicators are present—little signs freckle the roadways, you are getting more visitors to your door than you may be used to, and everyone is talking about change.

  • Pension legislation was tacked on and rushed through without needed input

    The common thread binding all good legislation is that, by the time the actual vote arrives, the outcome is all but a foregone conclusion.

    It takes a lot of effort to get to that point, of course.  Stakeholders need to be included early on, because they are the ones who will be most affected by any change, and the public must have the chance to weigh in as well.  It’s a process that can take months, but when it works, the positive impact is measured in years.

  • New technology is available but traditional research still important

    Welcome to my new genealogy column. After an extended hiatus, Editor Kristin Beck has graciously agreed to let me start writing on my favorite topic for The News-Democrat once again.

    It’s great to be back.

    While I enjoy the traditional genealogy research, my absolute passion is using DNA testing as a tool for finding more information about your family history.