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Columns

  • Library’s resources aid local students as school resumes

    At a meeting toward the end of June, I had a discussion about how quickly the summer was going by and that it seemed like it was almost over. The funny part about this discussion is that summer had not actually even started.
    Our definition of the seasons is no longer determined by when they actually start, but by when our idea of them starts. Summer might be the most extreme example of this, but they all seem to follow the pattern ingrained in us by the schedule we followed from age 5 to age 18: the school calendar.

  • Childhood mortality continues its decline with state’s efforts

    From a historical perspective, one of our country’s greatest success stories over the last century has been the steep decline in childhood mortality.
    Between 1907 and 2007, the number of children who did not make it to their fifth birthday dropped from about 1,400 out of every 100,000 to less than 30, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  For those ages five to 14, the mortality rate went from 307 to 15.

  • Conference provides insight into battle with drug epidemic

    As you’re reading this, as your Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County Coordinator, I’m with assistant coordinator Kimberly Fain finishing up our last day of Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America training.
    CADCA hosts an annual mid-year training institute for coalitions all across America and even some from other countries.
    As you all know, Champions Coalition in Carroll County is not the only organization that cares about diminishing drugs in their communities.

  • Education was focus of this year’s budget

    When it comes to budgets, there is one big difference between the federal government and the states: The states balance theirs at the end of the fiscal year.

    It can be a difficult task, especially when the economy is down.  Kentucky and nearly 20 other states have an added challenge as well, because they approve their budgets in two-year increments.  In our case, that means we have to peer more than 30 months into the future before determining how much money is expected to be available.

  • Try marinating meat, veggies, fruit before grilling

    Hello once again, my friends. I’m here typing this article on another warm, sunny day.

    Alright, I admit, it’s only warm and sunny because it’s 8 a.m. Hot and sunny would be a more accurate description. Oh well, its July, so I guess we are getting what we should expect. No matter how hot it gets, I never stop thinking about food.

    In the past few articles I’ve touched a little on grilling. Summer is grilling season, so I thought I would expound on that a bit.

  • Boone had plans to link Ghent, Vevay by rail

    An entrepreneur from Dayton, Ohio, at one time envisioned building a railroad line that would have extended from Ghent, Ky., to Savannah, Ga.

    Albert E. Boone, an indirect relative of Kentucky explorer Daniel Boone, was born Nov. 18, 1845, in Dayton, where he was educated and, at 16, enlisted in Co. I, 84th Ohio Volunteer Infantry at the start of the Civil War.

    According to “West Virginia and its People,” published in 1913, Boone eventually rose to the rank of colonel during his Army career.

  • Most new laws take effect July 15

    A common misconception about the legislative process is that all state laws take effect right after the governor signs them.

    While that assumption is understandable, the truth is that most laws are not official until 90 days after the end of a legislative session. This year, that date falls on July 15.

    There are some exceptions. If a law addresses a pressing need – as we saw this spring with the problem many school districts had regarding an excessive number of snow days – the fix the General Assembly passes can take effect immediately.

  • Cellphones seem to have our number

    By Leigh Landini Wright

    Reprinted from The Paducah Sun

    Eyes up.

    Chances are if you followed the Murray State University men’s basketball team during the past two years, you’ve seen Coach Steve Prohm’s two-word mantra trending on social media or mentioned in news stories. Those words, drawn from the Bible, are meant to keep his players focused.

  • Racing not a favorite, but appreciative of opportunity

    I will be completely honest with you: I am not a car racing fan.

    The words “Let’s go racing” do not make my blood pump or my stomach churn with excitement and nervousness for my favorite driver. Now, tell me the Dallas Cowboys are on TV, and I become an absolutely elated and tense stress ball, determined that I have the power to will “America’s Team” to victory.

  • Father, daughter inspire some kudos

    As I drove to the grocery store Sunday to pick up an item I failed to get Saturday, I saw a man and his daughter walking up Schuerman Street with a garbage bag in hand.

    They were picking up litter that others had tossed out along the street.

    Their actions impressed me for a couple of key reasons.

    First, there was no big community cleanup underway to inspire the father-daughter duo to hit the roadsides.