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Columns

  • Research ‘scratched surface’ of locals in Revolutionary War

    As a history geek, I really had a great time delving into the lives of those men, long forgotten, who served in the Revolutionary War and had actually lived here in Carroll County – Gallatin County, of course, at the time.

    I have a Revolutionary War solder on my father’s Hackett line. Josiah Hackett, born 1754 in Middleboro, Plymouth, Mass., first signed an oath against being in the war as a Quaker but later was lured into service while living in Westmoreland County, N.H.

  • New procedures in place for child support division at County Attorney’s Office

    Every day we all get notices in the mail regarding our privacy rights, our bank’s privacy policies and what information is protected by these rights and policies. The County Attorney’s Office is no different.

    Due to privacy policies and federal and state guidelines, the County Attorney’s Office has had to implement some new procedures and change the way we do business in the child support division.

  • Nation must stay committed to veterans

    On this day, in this month, 94 years ago, the guns of World War I went silent and our nation remembers this moment each year by recognizing the service and the sacrifice of our country’s veterans.

  • American Legion commander says not to forget veterans

    During the recent government shutdown many numbers were thrown around. But there is one number that stands out and it has nothing to do with the debate over the federal budget.

     More than one a day. That is how many members of our active-duty military, National Guard and Reserve forces have committed suicide over the past year. Simply put, we are losing more servicemembers by their own hands than we are by the enemy in Afghanistan.

  • Take a moment to pay respect to state veterans

    He may have been referring to the members of the Royal Air Force, but when British Prime Minister Winston Churchill said, “Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so few,” he could easily have been talking about our own country’s veterans.

    They make up less than 8 percent of the U.S.’ population, but it is no overstatement to say our lives would be very different without their countless contributions and sacrifices.

  • Take the opportunity to honor all who served

    As I sit here, I think about all the honors and privileges I have been given over the years of my life – getting to do things I dreamed of as a young boy.

    How many people ever get to, actually, live out their dreams?

    Well, I can say that I did. I started playing in the dirt as soon as I could crawl. When I was a little boy, my mother would take me to Fourth Street to see the soldiers getting on the buses to go serve their country.

  • Mentors can face greatest fears too

    No few people live on the cusp of becoming a mentor through Big Brothers Big Sisters of Carroll County. The benefits are obvious, the need even more obvious, but still people hold back. I think I know why.

    The great fear out there is finding yourself with a child who asks too much of you. I mean that in the sense of a Little Brother or Sister that needs what you cannot give in discipline or direction. There is un-doubtedly a belief among some that the children in the program bring extensive challenges to the adults who mentor them.

  • New Year’s Resolution – Now is the time!

    With changing leaves and temperatures we now know that the changing of the seasons is on its way. With Halloween’s trick or treat, Thanksgiving’s feast, Christmas’ family gatherings, and New Year’s big night of eats and drinks, we have hit the season of big eating. With that now starting to weigh on our minds for the planning and preparation of it all, now is also the time to plan for the caloric indulgence and how to fight it.

  • Workforce development remains a top priority for Kentucky leaders

    Whenever corporate leaders scout for new locations to expand or re-locate their business, they consider such obvious things as infrastructure, government incentives, taxes and the cost to build.

    Above all else, though, they look at the quality of the local workforce, according to annual surveys done by Site Selection magazine, a national trade publication that tracks economic development.

  • Kentucky addresses domestic violence problem with action

    On a typical day across the country, our domestic violence programs help more than 64,000 victims, 1,100 of whom live right here in Kentucky.

    But lack of funds, space and personnel mean another 10,000 have to wait for the services they need, including almost 90 here in the commonwealth.

    These findings, compiled last fall by the National Network to End Domestic Violence, are based on an in-depth survey that has been conducted annually for nearly a decade.