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Columns

  • DNA advances aid in researching ancestry

    Last month, I attended the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh, or GRIP, for a weeklong course in using DNA to aid in family history research.

    It was fascinating.

    It turns out that genetic genealogists are the driving force behind breakthroughs in DNA testing and tools to help analyze data, which can answer all sorts of questions that come up when researching a family tree.

  • Manage poultry parasite risks to avoid problems with fowl

    For poultry owners, scouting for parasites is an important management practice for the flock. Let us take a closer look at a variety of parasites that can attack poultry by either sucking blood or feeding on skin and feathers.

    Northern fowl mite:  The most common external parasites in chickens, turkeys, game birds, pigeons etc. are northern fowl mites. Spread through bird contact, signs of infestation depend on severity.  Chickens may lose weight, exhibit decreased feed intake and egg production, or become anemic.

  • Backpacks are best for students when used safely

    It’s back to school time and time to get all that school equipment ready for your child, be it a young child or teen. There is a lot to get done by the first day of school

    Back-packs are necessary school equipment for children and youth nowadays, from preschoolers to college students.

  • Schools champion students with pride, passion, purpose

    "Pride, Passion, Purpose” is the focus for this year in the Carroll County School District.

    “We’re still ‘Champions for Kids,’” said Superin-tendent Bill Hogan.  “However, champions take pride in their work, show passion for what they do, and have a purpose for each day. We want all of our employees to live that out each day.”

    The “Pride, Passion, Purpose” focus reveals the philosophy beneath the technology and organizational structures of the district.

  • Ky. agricultural production sets records

    Earlier this summer, Kentucky’s farming community got a jolt when the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported that no state had lost a greater percentage of farmland from 2007-12.

     Our 6.7 percent decline totaled almost a million acres, which is larger than Land Between the Lakes and the Daniel Boone National Forest combined. The number of farms dropped from 85,260 to 77,064. 

  • Internship gave insight into importance of solid community journalism

    Ten weeks goes by in the blink of an eye. I’ve told several people, even though we published the back-to-school sections in The News-Democrat and The Trimble Banner a week and a half ago, it feels like just yesterday that I was taking photos at the moving up ceremony at Carroll County Middle School.

    What have I learned in 10 weeks? I don’t even know where to begin.

  • Kentucky has detoured down road of educational haves and have nots

    Lexington Herald-Leader
    How did we get here from there?
    Hope was in the air in Kentucky in the spring of 1997 when, in a special session, the legislature passed the Postsecondary Education Improvement Act.
    The ambitious goal was to change the landscape and give young Kentuckians the same shot at getting a college degree as kids in any other state in the union. The goal was more than individual opportunity. With an educated work force, Kentucky could rise from its historic place near the bottom of most socio-economic measures.

  • EDUCATION PAYS

    About a month ago, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reaffirmed what has long been assumed: A college degree really is worth the investment.
    Using data dating back to 1973, the Fed determined that those with a bachelor’s degree earn about $64,500 a year, which is nearly $24,000 more than someone who finishes their education at the end of high school.  Over a career, that difference adds up to $1.2 million, or nearly 10 times the cost to earn that four-year diploma.

  • Library’s resources aid local students as school resumes

    At a meeting toward the end of June, I had a discussion about how quickly the summer was going by and that it seemed like it was almost over. The funny part about this discussion is that summer had not actually even started.
    Our definition of the seasons is no longer determined by when they actually start, but by when our idea of them starts. Summer might be the most extreme example of this, but they all seem to follow the pattern ingrained in us by the schedule we followed from age 5 to age 18: the school calendar.

  • Childhood mortality continues its decline with state’s efforts

    From a historical perspective, one of our country’s greatest success stories over the last century has been the steep decline in childhood mortality.
    Between 1907 and 2007, the number of children who did not make it to their fifth birthday dropped from about 1,400 out of every 100,000 to less than 30, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  For those ages five to 14, the mortality rate went from 307 to 15.