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Columns

  • Ky. agricultural production sets records

    Earlier this summer, Kentucky’s farming community got a jolt when the U.S. Department of Agriculture reported that no state had lost a greater percentage of farmland from 2007-12.

     Our 6.7 percent decline totaled almost a million acres, which is larger than Land Between the Lakes and the Daniel Boone National Forest combined. The number of farms dropped from 85,260 to 77,064. 

  • Internship gave insight into importance of solid community journalism

    Ten weeks goes by in the blink of an eye. I’ve told several people, even though we published the back-to-school sections in The News-Democrat and The Trimble Banner a week and a half ago, it feels like just yesterday that I was taking photos at the moving up ceremony at Carroll County Middle School.

    What have I learned in 10 weeks? I don’t even know where to begin.

  • Kentucky has detoured down road of educational haves and have nots

    Lexington Herald-Leader
    How did we get here from there?
    Hope was in the air in Kentucky in the spring of 1997 when, in a special session, the legislature passed the Postsecondary Education Improvement Act.
    The ambitious goal was to change the landscape and give young Kentuckians the same shot at getting a college degree as kids in any other state in the union. The goal was more than individual opportunity. With an educated work force, Kentucky could rise from its historic place near the bottom of most socio-economic measures.

  • EDUCATION PAYS

    About a month ago, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reaffirmed what has long been assumed: A college degree really is worth the investment.
    Using data dating back to 1973, the Fed determined that those with a bachelor’s degree earn about $64,500 a year, which is nearly $24,000 more than someone who finishes their education at the end of high school.  Over a career, that difference adds up to $1.2 million, or nearly 10 times the cost to earn that four-year diploma.

  • Library’s resources aid local students as school resumes

    At a meeting toward the end of June, I had a discussion about how quickly the summer was going by and that it seemed like it was almost over. The funny part about this discussion is that summer had not actually even started.
    Our definition of the seasons is no longer determined by when they actually start, but by when our idea of them starts. Summer might be the most extreme example of this, but they all seem to follow the pattern ingrained in us by the schedule we followed from age 5 to age 18: the school calendar.

  • Childhood mortality continues its decline with state’s efforts

    From a historical perspective, one of our country’s greatest success stories over the last century has been the steep decline in childhood mortality.
    Between 1907 and 2007, the number of children who did not make it to their fifth birthday dropped from about 1,400 out of every 100,000 to less than 30, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  For those ages five to 14, the mortality rate went from 307 to 15.

  • Conference provides insight into battle with drug epidemic

    As you’re reading this, as your Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County Coordinator, I’m with assistant coordinator Kimberly Fain finishing up our last day of Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America training.
    CADCA hosts an annual mid-year training institute for coalitions all across America and even some from other countries.
    As you all know, Champions Coalition in Carroll County is not the only organization that cares about diminishing drugs in their communities.

  • Education was focus of this year’s budget

    When it comes to budgets, there is one big difference between the federal government and the states: The states balance theirs at the end of the fiscal year.

    It can be a difficult task, especially when the economy is down.  Kentucky and nearly 20 other states have an added challenge as well, because they approve their budgets in two-year increments.  In our case, that means we have to peer more than 30 months into the future before determining how much money is expected to be available.

  • Try marinating meat, veggies, fruit before grilling

    Hello once again, my friends. I’m here typing this article on another warm, sunny day.

    Alright, I admit, it’s only warm and sunny because it’s 8 a.m. Hot and sunny would be a more accurate description. Oh well, its July, so I guess we are getting what we should expect. No matter how hot it gets, I never stop thinking about food.

    In the past few articles I’ve touched a little on grilling. Summer is grilling season, so I thought I would expound on that a bit.

  • Boone had plans to link Ghent, Vevay by rail

    An entrepreneur from Dayton, Ohio, at one time envisioned building a railroad line that would have extended from Ghent, Ky., to Savannah, Ga.

    Albert E. Boone, an indirect relative of Kentucky explorer Daniel Boone, was born Nov. 18, 1845, in Dayton, where he was educated and, at 16, enlisted in Co. I, 84th Ohio Volunteer Infantry at the start of the Civil War.

    According to “West Virginia and its People,” published in 1913, Boone eventually rose to the rank of colonel during his Army career.