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Columns

  • How to safely dispose of needles, syringes

    Summer is here! That means kids playing in parks, barefoot play, outdoor cleaning and river sweeps are here too. You’ve been asking: What do I do if I find a needle? How do I dispose of it? We have your answers and tips to doing so.

    According to the Department of Health, Australian Government the recommended way to dispose of a discarded needle and syringe varies between cities and states.

  • Stay cool by fixing salads, grilling/cooking outdoors

    Hello once again, my friends. As I write this article there is only one thing I can say. It’s hot! It’s summer time, of course, so I guess it should be, but it always surprises me at how quickly I am ready for the dog days of summer to be over even when they are just first starting.

    That leads me right in to this month’s cooking thoughts. When it’s boiling hot outside, it’s time to pull out all the stops to make food preparation easier.

  • Holding public records hostage

    By AMYE BENSENHAVER

    Bluegrass Institute Center for Open Government

    While employed as an instructor at the University of Kentucky’s School of Journalism, former hostage Terry Anderson recounted his five-year battle with federal agencies to obtain copies of public records under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) relating to the government’s efforts to secure his release from Hezbollah kidnappers during his nearly seven-year captivity.

  • Flag Day deserves to be recognized

    Flag Day commemorates the official adoption of the Stars and Stripes as our national symbol, an action taken by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777.

    Usually this isn’t much of a holiday. Stores are busy, federal and state offices are open, and the US Postal Service runs the mail. Come June 14 each year, the vast majority of Americans probably have no idea that a holiday is being observed.

    I believe Flag Day deserves better. So let’s pause for just a minute to reflect on why.

  • Social media posts can have real life repercussions

    Technology has become one of those buzzwords that can mean a lot of different things or nothing really at all. It is interesting that we have such words in our language. I love it when someone answers a question with a very lengthy, high in vocabulary sentence, but when you break it down they really did not say much at all. I think technology has fallen into that category.

  • Thank veterans, first responders for their service

    At the base of the United States Marine Corps. War Memorial–also known as the Iwo Jima Memorial–there is a quote from World War II Admiral Chester Nimitz. The admiral said, “Uncommon valor was a common virtue.”

  • Who pays for fish and wildlife conservation?

    As Co-Chair of the Kentucky Legislative Sportsmen’s Caucus, I find it fitting to take a moment to extend an enormous debt of gratitude to our hunters and anglers. The critical contributions that these sportsmen and women make to our economy and professional fish and wildlife management in the Bluegrass State ensure that we will enjoy access to our hunting and angling traditions now and into the future. 

  • Massie: Don’t tax Social Security benefits

    On May 19, I re-introduced the Senior Citizens Tax Elimination Act (H.R. 2552). This bill would assist our struggling middle class by eliminating an unnecessary and unjust double-tax on seniors.

  • Bunning one of a kind lately out of production

    By TIM SULLIVAN

    Courier-Journal

    Ted Williams ripped off his shirt without bothering with the buttons. The great Boston slugger was so steamed at striking out three times in a single game that he began plotting his revenge before leaving the locker room.

    “He walked over to the schedule on the wall, ran his finger down until he came to the next Detroit series,” recalled Gene Mauch, then a Red Sox infielder.

    Finding the date, Williams made a vow.

  • State lawmakers enact legislation to assist, support our veterans

     When I try to think of everything our military men and women have given us as Americans, I quickly realize the error of my ways. It’s impossible to account for everything our military men and women have done for us. From those first moments in the battle for freedom on colonial soil to the deserts of the Middle East today, their amazing acts of selflessness for this nation has been constant.