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Columns

  • Florida trip brings back memories

    I took a break from NCAA basketball  Sunday afternoon and while channel surfing came upon the 1960 movie “Where the Boys Are.”  This was the spring break movie of my high school years and teens everywhere made Connie Francis’ song of the same title number one across the nation.

    In this movie, the girls wore crinolines, heels, and white gloves when they went out to dinner; the boys wore suits and ties.

    On the beach in the evenings, girls wore pedal pushers and their blouses tucked neatly in. 

  • Lawmakers see progress on many fronts

    Each legislative session is invariably remembered for one or two high-profile laws, but there are always many others that, while not getting as much attention, are important as well.

  • Champions look to help ‘Kick Butts’ in county

    On March 20, we celebrated “Kick Butts Day.” Think cigarettes.

    This is a national holiday celebrated across America by those who rally together in hopes of persuading their family members or friends to quit smoking. It’s also noted as a holiday to celebrate the day an individual actually succeeded when deciding to stop smoking, whether it be weeks, months or years.

  • Library ramping up for local spring activities

    I think spring is almost here, but it is hard to tell with this crazy weather. I know it officially starts today, but it is cold, gloomy, and quite frankly wintery.

    I miss the consistency of July and August. You pretty much know it is going to be hot with varying levels of high humidity. These days, it will be 65 degrees one day and the next day it will snow from sun up to sun down. 

    I know I should be more optimistic. I should be thankful for the 65 degree day, but I sure do miss sunshine.

  • Lawmakers wrap up work on bills

    Although several major issues are still pending, the General Assembly wrapped up much of its work early last week, and for a “short” legislative session, there is already a fairly long list of key bills that have made it to Gov. Beshear’s desk.

  • Chamber committees work on many projects

    In the past two chamber of commerce articles, we have looked into the rich history of the organization and met the current board members.  Now, let us explore the different opportunities available through being a member of chamber.

    The Carroll County Chamber of Commerce offers a wide variety of opportunities for you and your business to get involved. If you are interested in becoming a chamber member, contact the chamber of commerce office at (502) 732-7035. The office is located at 511 Highland Avenue, Carrollton.

  • Online sites aid in family genealogy searches

    With so much information on the Internet these days, it seems easier than ever to do family history research without ever leaving the comfort of  home.

  • Lawmakers stay busy as session winds down

    Even as many schools closed across the commonwealth due to snow last week, Frankfort shrugged off the white stuff and continued with our work. After this week, only a few days remain of the 2013 Session.

    Kentucky has in place a process for improvement for struggling schools. When the state Department of Education cites a school for being persistently low-achieving, there are several options the school board can choose from such as restaffing, allowing an outside management company to lead a turnaround effort, or even closing.

  • Penalties for driving under the influence not worth the risk

    As summer draws near and warmer weather begins to make its appearance, spring fever is beginning to set in. It will not be long before people are going to ballgames, enjoying our parks, boating on the river or hitting 18 holes of golf.

    Summer is a lot of fun, but for some it can also be dangerous. We all like to have a good time, and some like to drink a beer or a cocktail to enhance their summertime experiences. If you choose to enjoy your summertime this way, please do so responsibly.

  • House looks at pension funding options

    Like most other states, and many local communities as well, Kentucky is facing a serious challenge when it comes to the long-term viability of our public retirement systems.

    They were more than fully funded as recently as a dozen years ago, but the country’s two recessions since then have taken a significant toll, much as they have with the retirement plans for millions of Americans.