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Columns

  • City, county laws are in place on pets to protect residents

    At the start of summer, everyone wants to be outside enjoying the warm weather, nature and the beautiful surroundings that we have in our county. Sometimes that enjoyment is hampered by others’ actions.

    It seems as though my office and the office of the county judge-executive have been inundated with complaints about dogs. The complaints have included dogs running loose, people having too many dogs and allowing vicious dogs to run loose. As such, I decided to write this month’s column to clarify the various laws dealing with dogs that we should all live by.

  • Arts foundation hosts ‘progressive dinner’ featuring music and arts

    The Carroll County Arts Foundation, Port William Historical Society, and the Carroll County Public Library are hosting an event we hope catches on and becomes an annual tradition. 

  • Howe, Winslow brought businesses to Carrollton

    Doing the research for the “Images of America” book was a lot of fun, but unfortunately the format didn’t allow me to put in much information about any one person or event.

    Case in point: Beverly Winslow Howe, whose image appears on Page 56. Howe was a member of a very prominent and influential family that was involved in many businesses in Carrollton. He was born in this city Nov. 18, 1885, to William F. and Louisiana (a.k.a. Louise) Winslow Howe.

  • Big Sister finds many rewards in spending time with her ‘Little’

    By JUDY CHOWNING

    Special to the News-Democrat

    Why did I want to be a Big Sister when I had four grandchildren under the age of four?

    I thought I could give an hour a week to make a child feel as special as I tried to make my own grandchildren feel.

    Tara was in kindergarten when we started meeting at school in 2010. I was babysitting three days a week for two of my grandchildren and had visits from my others regularly I visited with Tara on days that I had off from my Grammy duties.

  • State acts to address cancer stats

    Each year, 25,000 Kentuckians – nearly 70 a day – are given the one diagnosis nobody ever wants to hear from their doctor: Cancer.

    If there is a silver lining surrounding this sizeable cloud, it is that we are seeing true progress in making sure this word is said much less often. Nationally, deaths are down a fifth from their peak in 1991, and most types of cancers – but not all – are in decline.

  • Look for ‘organic’ when buying these fruits, vegetables

     With summer here, we all begin to try to eat more fruits and vegetables for their benefits and light-meal preparation adaptability.

    With that, we have to be aware of the fruits and vegetables we purchase. The Environ-mental Working Group recently published its annual guide to the top 12 fruits and vegetables with pesticides.

    How this
    helps you

    Choose organic produce when buying anything on the dirty dozen list.

  • State makes progress on educating children

    As we put another school year behind us – and as parents wait for the inevitable cries of “I’m bored” in the not-too-distant future – now is a good time to take a closer look at all of the good things going on academically.

    Over the long term, perhaps the best news came out of a 2012 Harvard study, which showed Kentucky tying for fifth among the states when measuring the gains our students have made over the last 20 years in math, reading and science.

  • Champions needs community support to battle substance abuse

     I would like to take this opportunity to announce that Kimberly Fain is the new assistant coordinator, hired through the Carroll County School Board and Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County. The application and interview process was held in April.

    We are proud to have Fain aboard with Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County. She is rather familiar with the community and eager to learn. Hopefully within the near future, those of you reading this will be able to meet both of us and we can make strides to diminish substance abuse in Carroll County.

  • ‘Impact’ is a must-see, fair depiction of tragic I-71 bus crash in 1988

    I have to admit, it wasn’t until I moved here just over 11 years ago that I learned anything about the church bus crash on May 14, 1988.

    At the time, I was a very young reporter in Fairfield County, Conn. I didn’t even own a TV, which wasn’t an issue because most nights I had to cover meetings or events. I didn’t watch the national news very often, and of course this was long before the Internet. If something happened someplace other than the towns where I worked, I didn’t know about it.

  • Summer Reading Program enriches children’s lives

    I enjoyed Carroll County Public Library Director Hillary Arney remembering her Summer Reading Pro-gram experiences at the library when she was a child. The reference in her column last week  to the large banana split brought a smile to my face.

    It was my first year as director of the public library; in fact, I had only been working there since the first of June and jumped right in with our reading program.