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Columns

  • Students learn they have better things to do than drugs

    The spirit of Christmas doesn’t have to end Dec. 25. Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County sponsors two clubs for students, and we are learning that we definitely have better things to do than drugs. One if them is doing good deeds for others.

  • It’s time to take steps to protect our children from deranged gunmen

    Friday’s shooting in a Connecticut elementary school has this nation reeling with emotion. I am no exception.

    I am devastated and deeply saddened for the victims and for their families. I am sad for the shooter and his family, because somehow this man’s problems went unnoticed, and his family is also paying the price.

    I am frustrated that these situations are becoming more and more commonplace – and more and more deadly.

    And I’m angry. On so many levels.

  • Gun laws should be strengthened after shootings at Sandy Hook

    December is such a joyous month for so many.  It’s a time when we reconnect with old friends; a time when we gather with our co-workers for social events; a time when neighbors and members of organizations get together to share good food and drink and probably some laughs.

    It’s also a sad time for many of us. Losses that occur in December seem especially poignant to me. A year ago, I lost my very good friend Evelyn Welch, and in 1977 my father died on Dec. 22. 

  • Kentuckians give time, money to help others

    If it seems that the news is often filled more with what’s wrong with the world than what’s right, the holidays give us a chance to flip that equation for a time.

    Here in Kentucky, it doesn’t take long to find some good news across the state.

    Earlier this fall, for example, we learned our citizens are much more willing to give to charitable causes than those living in most other states.  According to the Chronicle of Philanthropy, we rank 15th in this category.

  • Nine sure-fire steps to get the most from training, exercise

    Training and getting in shape isn’t exactly rocket science. You lift, do cardio, try to eat right and get plenty of sleep (well, at least enough). It is not that complex, but it is not that simple either.

    Many people can follow the same training routines and eat the same foods, yet their results may vary significantly. After our discussion last month about getting organized and focused, let’s look at some tips and tricks we can employ to maximize our results.

  • ‘Pippa’s Big Adventure’ – or, ‘How Fortune Smiled upon Us Both’

    I was reminded last week of just how inattentive I can be at times. Or, perhaps, I may just be such an airhead at times that it’s a wonder I get along as well as I do. 

    I am the first to tell the stories on myself … before someone else, I guess. I call this story “Pippa’s Big Adventure.”

    My friend Cindy had traveled from Marietta, Ohio, to Northern Kentucky for a medical procedure and I was to drive her back to Marietta. My 9-pound terrier-mix, Pippa, a rescue from Carroll County Animal Support, would be along for the ride.

  • All adults have a role in child’s upbringing

    The African proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child,” has never had so much meaning as it does in today’s society.

    The responsibility of raising a child is often shared with the larger, extended family – grandparents, aunts, uncles, older siblings. Neighbors and friends also can participate in a child’s upbringing.

    In fact, bringing caring adults into a child’s life is the secret to helping them grow into healthy, happy and responsible adults. And it isn’t really a secret at all.

  • Donate nonperishable food item to have library fines forgiven

    According to the nonprofit group Feeding America, 50.1 million Americans were living in “food insecure homes” last year. Of that number, 16 million were children.

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture defines a food-insecure home as one in which there is reduced quality, variety or desirability of diet. This can ultimately affect or disrupt the number of meals available to a family. Unfortunately, these statistics may not be surprise many of us. Americans living in hunger is a very real problem.

  • Tragic events leave mark on East, county

    I had thought to write this week about the colorful folds of the Kentucky Hills as I cross the bridge from Madison Ind., to Milton. It’s appropriate that the library hangs quilts this time of year because they seem a celebration of the season.

    I was all prepared to tell of the saga of getting my car titled and getting a driver’s license in Indiana and the ordeal it became. Or I could tell a funny tale of my little seven-pound dog eating my expensive tri-focal no-line sunglasses.

  • Theater in Carrollton has a rich history that extends into 1800s