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Columns

  • House OKs measures to stop illegal drug sales, use in Kentucky

    As it normally does during the first full week of March in even-numbered years, the Kentucky House of Representatives will vote on its proposed budget this week to run state government.

  • Boyd reminisces about childhood church services

    Thanks from me as a member of the Carroll County Animal Support Group to everyone who attended our chili supper Saturday night. We raised a record amount of money for this affair, with meal sales, bake sale and our silent auction items. So many in the community contributed to the silent auction and again, we raised more money through that this year than ever before. Our bake sale table was laden with scrumptious goodies created by volunteer bakers.   Mark Louden in the early part of the evening and Power Plant later on provided enjoyable music  that the crowd enjoyed.

  • Do your part to fight Carroll’s war on drugs

    Today in North America, 2,500 teenagers will abuse prescription drugs, according to the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP). If you add it up, it totals 17,500 per week people are using prescription medication for some purpose other than its intended use.

    According to the research from our KASPER system here in Kentucky, over 180,000 prescription narcotic pills were prescribed in Carroll County in 2010. Most of these pills were used legitimately. However, as seen in the local news, not all of them were. 

  • Gas price flucuations keep drivers guessing; Animal support hosts chili supper fundraiser

    Is it just me or does buying gas make you feel like a gambler? 

    Two weeks ago prices at the pump were dropping — $3.08, 3.05, 3.03.

    Every day it appeared to go down, but I kept watching those prices and hoping the odds would be in my favor and I could fill up for $3 a gallon.

    Nope, didn’t happen. I wound up filling my tank at around $3.50 per gallon. Then  I drove till I was afraid the fumes would run out and filled up next at $3.23.

    Two days later it was $3.06. 

  • Cummings offered anti-drug message for local community

    Last week I was privileged to attend the Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America Leadership Forum in National Harbor, Md., a suburb of Washington D.C. The conference was a culmination of the three week National Coalition Academy that we attended in 2011 in Meridian, Miss. 

    During the conference there were many sessions, speakers and even dignitaries yet one stood out in my mind more than any. Maryland Rep. Elijah Cummings spoke at the luncheon Thursday afternoon. The story that he shared is one that you can draw great insight from.

  • Wild pigs, chemicals used in schools, child obesity among bills before House

    While no one can predict exactly what will pass in a regular legislative session, one constant can always be counted on: Diversity. Last week was a textbook example of that in action in the Kentucky House, with legislation ranging from wild pigs to alternative energy projects.

  • Senate approves education bills, prepares to work on Ky. budget

    We are now a quarter way through session. Bills are flowing through the committee process and arriving on the Senate floor for consideration before the entire chamber.

     Three bills won passage this week and will now head to the House of Represent-atives. Senate Bill 55 allows for interstate mutual aid agreements among first-responders and other emergency response personnel. That is to say, that if an emergency occurs near local or state borders, emergency personnel can respond regardless of their home base.

  • Lawmakers tackle range of legislation in House

    With January behind us, the General Assembly is finding the quick pace that defined the legislative session’s opening days is now settling into a more measured routine.

    The first few weeks, of course, were dominated by two main actions: Gov. Steve Beshear’s speeches on the state of the Commonwealth and his budget proposal; and redistricting, which the House and Senate undertake each decade to reflect population changes in their districts and those of the Kentucky Supreme Court and our congressional delegation.

  • Redistricting makes Hornback county’s new state senator

    Hello. My name is Paul Hornback and I am your new state senator.

    It is our constitutional duty every 10 years to realign our voting districts according to population after each census. This act fulfills the requirement of one man, one vote. Because of population shifts, the 20th State Senatorial District now includes Carroll County in addition to part of Boone and Jefferson counties and all of Gallatin, Henry, Shelby and Spencer counties. (The final congressional district lines are still being discussed between the chambers.)

  • Library gathering on anniversary recounted stories from ‘37 flood

    In 1987, the 50th anniversary of the flood, I was in my fifth year as director of the public library. During those first five years I had heard many of our patrons refer to the flood, had seen the plaque in the court house, had learned that many of the old copies of The News-Democrat had been destroyed as water rose into the newspaper offices, and had begun to gather photographs and articles about that very significant period in Carroll County’s history.