.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • House OKs increase in minimum wage

    Seven years after the General Assembly voted overwhelmingly to raise the state’s minimum wage, the Kentucky House of Representatives returned to the issue on Thursday when it passed legislation that follows a similar path taken by that 2007 law.

    This is an issue that is drawing a lot of attention across the country. The National Conference of State Legislatures says 23 states considered raising it in 2013, and Kentucky is one of 20 doing the same this year, with more expected in the months ahead.

  • Senate seeks to save public funds and assist agriculture

    February opened with snow and ice across most of Kentucky. I hope you and yours are safe. As crews are out working all hours of the night, and utility workers restoring power to the many areas that lost it, I am reminded of, and appreciate, the people that are out working in these tough and hazardous conditions.

    Despite the tough conditions in travel, the Senate continued working with a full week of committee hearings and bills that came to the Senate floor for vote.

  • Communications bill wins Senate OK

    This week in Frankfort, the Senate passed key pieces of legislation that help our students and school districts, provide economic development and access to better communications, and give law enforcement time-saving investigation procedures.

    I am happy to report my Senate Bill 99 passed on Thursday. The bill enables rural citizens to have access to communications infrastructure for better wireless and broadband service.

  • House approves measures to improve education, raise the minimum wage

    With more than half of state government’s revenue dedicated to education, it shouldn’t be a surprise that many of the bills considered by the General Assembly every year are also centered on the subject.

    That was certainly the case last week in the Kentucky House of Represent-atives, which sent to the Senate several pieces of legislation designed to improve different facets of our schools.

  • Senators hear governor’s budget plan, eye bills on elections, abortion

    After observing Martin Luther King, Jr. Day on Monday, the Legislature went back to work.

    Tuesday was a significant day as Senate President Pro Tem Katie Stine became the first female legislator to preside over the joint session of the Kentucky General Assembly, during which Gov. Steve Beshear presented his proposed budget.

    During the address, Beshear presented a multi-faceted budget proposal of $20.3 billion for the next two fiscal years. The plan calls for 5 percent cuts to most state agencies, proposes a gas tax increase and borrows $1.9 billion in new debt.

  • Governor’s budget would raises teacher salaries, boost education

    Shortly after Gov. Steve Beshear first took office in late 2007, he remarked that not only did he find the cupboard bare, it was actually gone.

    It hasn’t gotten any easier since then.  Cumulative budget cuts over the last six years have reached $1.6 billion, the state government workforce has shrunk to its smallest size in 40 years and the list of needs continues to grow faster than the revenue coming in.

  • “Firefighter Greg” returns to Kathryn Winn Feb. 4

    On behalf of all the members of the Carrollton Fire Department, I am ecstatic to announce that for the second straight year we will be partnering with Carroll County Schools to bring our Fire Prevention Program back into the classroom. Building upon the success of last year, our firefighters are eager to begin working with the students and staff.

  • Senators tackle bills on illegal drugs, nurse practitoners, more

    The second week of the 2014 Regular Session brought schedules packed with meetings, rallies, press conferences and hearings on bills. We met with constituents, citizen groups and fellow lawmakers as we began vetting proposed legislation.

  • House lawmakers eye giving felons back their right to vote

    Last week, the House of Representatives turned its attention to two issues that may not seem to have much in common but are linked nonetheless because of the positive impact both could have on a significant number of Kentuckians.

    The first vote came early in the week, when the chamber put its support behind the creation of public benefit corporations. As its name implies, this legal designation would give private businesses a chance to better verify their commitment to serving, not just their customers, but their community as well.

  • Early college offers credit for students while in high school

    The Early College Program is a partnership between Carroll County High School and JCTC. It is open to juniors and seniors who have achieved “college ready” status by hitting benchmarks in English, reading and math on the ACT or Compass assessments.