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Columns

  • Medical association says obesity is a disease

    Most people think of obese people as lazy and undisciplined. More than 90 percent of people who try to lose weight gain it back within a year.

    America is in the midst of an obesity epidemic with no end in sight. The medical establishment has, in some cases, thrown its hands up trying to deal with the problem.

  • N Ky. Salt Festival one of many fall events held in Kentucky

    Fall may technically have begun early last week, but for many Kentuckians, it really started about a month ago, when the season’s first wave of festivals arrived.

    Our nation has always used the harvest period as a time of celebration, and these gatherings, many of which draw tens of thousands of tourists, seem to grow more popular with each passing year.

  • Liven up dishes by adding simple ingredients

    Hello my friends. As I sit here typing this I can only think of the glorious weather outside. Well, that and the wonderful food that is about to come our way. Fall, of course, brings leaves of varying shades, children in costumes consuming far more candy than they should and most importantly, football. All that being the case, it also brings back the hearty foods of cool weather making it one of my favorite times of year to cook.

  • Celebrate Red Ribbon Week Oct. 27-31

    For many people, October is a month of awareness. Whether it is breast cancer, domestic violence or anti-bullying, it is a month to raise awareness and funds for causes that we are all passionate about.

  • Arney thankful for support in transition to new tax rate law

    This year has been full of changes for places like the library.  Any group that can collect taxes or is funded by tax dollars must register with the state auditor’s office and come before fiscal court to discuss their tax rates. This was a new process for us this year, and, with the help of the Kentucky Department of Libraries and Archives and our own Fiscal Court, it has been a seamless transition.

  • Voting is one of the most important rights in both the federal and state constitutions

    Starting this week, hundreds of state legislators from across the country will begin visiting classrooms to kick off the 16th annual “America’s Legislators Back to School Program.”

    Sponsored by the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), this event initially lasted just one day, but now extends through much of the school year.  While most students tour the state Capitol at least once, often during a field trip in elementary school, this program flips that by bringing state government to them.

  • Golf carts illegal in Carroll cities, county

     An interesting question was asked of me the other day as County Attorney and I know the same question has been asked before: Can you drive a golf cart on the road in Carroll County? So I decided to research the issue a bit and hopefully answer the question once and for all.

    In short, my answer is “no.” You cannot drive a golf cart on the streets or roadways in Carroll County.

  • Rand reflects on Kentucky’s ties to the September 11th tragedy

     On Thursday this week, our nation will pause to remember those whose lives were lost on Sept. 11, 2001.

    If you are old enough to recall exactly where you were and what you were doing when you first heard the news, it can seem difficult to believe that 13 years have passed.

  • CCHS students to receive training for new laptops

    All Carroll County High School students this year are getting a driver’s license – a digital driver’s license.  The Carroll County School District is working with the University of Kentucky’s Digital Driver’s License (DDL) program to ensure that the students have the training that they need.  With students receiving new Lenovo laptops as part of the high school’s recent one-to-one rollout, DDLs help students safely and effectively use the laptops for learning.

  • Lottery funding helps to fund student educational programs

    Earlier this spring, the Kentucky Lottery reached a major milestone when it marked a quarter-century since its first ticket was sold in the commonwealth.

    This spring was also when the General Assembly lifted a little-known prohibition that had kept the lottery from advertising how the state’s proceeds are spent, even though it has generally been known that this money goes toward education.