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Columns

  • Unique variety of festivals are held in Kentucky every autumn

    If there is one theme binding the numerous festivals that take place across the commonwealth each year, it’s that if we raise it, grow it or use a lot of it, there’s almost certainly a community that celebrates it.

    Most of these festivals take place over a 10-week period that begins in late August and runs through Halloween, and food is often the focal point.  During that time, you can find events dedicated to apples, chicken, country ham, sorghum, bourbon, honey, barbecue and even salt.

  • Retirement leaves AG office less equipped to deal with open meetings, open records

    Editor’s note: The article referenced in this column, “Kentucky’s Open Records Law: Celebrating the 40th anniversary of Open Government,” is on page 3.

    Amye Bensenhaver likes to talk. There’s no denying that. She’s talks fast, too, like she’s afraid she won’t be able to give you all the information she has before the next question comes. And Amye has a lot of information.

    That is, of course, why I called her.

  • Rand reflects on how Kentuckians were involved in the 9/11 tragedy

    On Sunday morning, our nation will pause to remember and reflect upon the tragedy known primarily by its date: 9/11.

    Those of us old enough to remember that Tuesday in 2001 will never forget where we were and what we were doing when we heard the news.  It had the same impact as such other pivotal moments in history, from the attack on Pearl Harbor and President Kennedy’s assassination to Neil Armstrong’s walking on the moon.

  • Labor Day honors the American workforce

    At their core, the major American holidays are bound by a common thread: They remind us of who we are and what we stand for, each and every year.

    While the Fourth of July celebrates our founding and freedom, Memorial Day and Veterans Day call on us never to forget the high price paid for those enduring gifts. Thanksgiving gives us a moment among loved ones to appreciate the many good things in our lives, and on Labor Day, which arrives this weekend, we pay tribute to the hard work that made our nation what it is today.

  • Parent involvement promotes children’s success

    I had the privilege of attending a Title I meeting for our schools on Monday night at Kathryn Winn Primary. I will refer to the experience in the loosest sense of the term as a “meeting” because the only people there was myself and Gerda Wise with the school district. Despite the low number of attendees I found it to be very informative and felt this month’s column would be an excellent vehicle for sharing the information with others.

  • Arney offers three things you can do to eat better

    When asked to critique people’s diets and come up with changes that they would make, sometimes some of the changes made are more significant than others. However, one thing often found is that there are similar mistakes being made, which ultimately means that they are seen and the same changes needing to be made are on a continual basis.

    Highlighted below are the three most common changes that are needed within your diet, based on the diets seen on a day-to-day basis.

    Fiber balance

  • Legislators looking at the education special needs students now receive

    Before the mid-1970s, special education in our country’s public schools was all but non-existent. Many students were either outright denied the opportunity to attend because of their disability or they received inferior instruction if they were able to enroll.

    That thankfully began to change in 1975, when Congress passed the Education for All Handicapped Children Act and required each state to provide appropriate services in this critical area.

  • Champions reaches out to students through a wide range of methods

    Buses are loaded up, lunchboxes are packed up and students have returned to school in Carroll County. At Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County, we are geared up and excited for a fun-filled year with education and prevention at our forefront as always.

  • Number of highway fatalities in Ky., increasing after low in 2013

    About a decade ago, Kentucky started to see a welcome trend as the number of highway fatalities began a steady decline.

    Totals that regularly exceeded 900 a year before 2007 dropped to 638 in 2013, a figure not seen in the commonwealth since the 1940s.

    Unfortunately, that was as low as it would go.  The number of fatalities on our roads last year was almost a fifth higher than the benchmark set just two years earlier, and through the first seven-plus months of this year, it’s eight percent ahead of where it was last August.

  • Kentucky scores well in graduation gap; middle of the road in travel stats

    Kentucky received some welcome news last month when a national study found that no state had a smaller gap when comparing the high school graduation rates of students from low- and higher-income families.

    The average gap across the country stands at 15 percent, but it’s just 1 percent here in the commonwealth.  In fact, our low-income students graduate at a higher rate than the overall national average, something only five other states can say.