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Columns

  • Library thanks United Charities

  • Budget cuts hollowing out court system

    As chief justice, I find it disheartening that I can no longer assure you that the courts in Kentucky will be open when you need them. For the first time in modern history, we will have to close every courthouse in the state to balance the Judicial Branch budget. For three days in 2012, we must furlough all court personnel and close all courthouse doors because the General Assembly has not allotted enough money to fund court operations at current levels.

  • Liven up a summer party with Bloody Mary tomatoes

     I spent several hours with my Club Sisters this past weekend discussing a menu we were going to prepare together.  Of course, we got off on our many tangents, because that is what talking about food does for anyone.  It started with us reminiscing about foods we had had throughout the years and oh how good they were.

  • Photos still needed to complete photo book on Carroll County

    With my final deadline now just a couple of weeks away, time is running out and I am now to a point where I’m looking only for specific photos to make this Carroll County book project complete.

    I have already scanned hundreds of wonderful photos, and now I have to go through and determine which ones will “make the cut.” Thank you to everyone who has donated these images.

  • Colorado shootings causes heartache

     Everything I begin to write tonight feels wrong. I want to write about the ache in my heart for those families touched by the events early Friday morning in Aurora, Colo. Words seem banal, not enough as I type, delete and type again.

  • Pies add tasty treat to Extension council meeting

     I recently took three pies to a Carroll County Cooperative Extension Council meeting. We met to mull over our wishes for the type of 4-H leader we would like for our community. 

    Pie was the perfect food to bring for just such an occasion, and after seeing all our wishes recorded in big letters on poster paper in front of us, we should definitely get a perfect 4-H agent. We now have two perfect agents in Grace Angotti and Kristin Herbst, so why not a third coming in the very near future.

  • Record temperatures make time at the speedway difficult, limit dog walks and other activities

     Well what else is there to write about except the weather?  The older I get, the harder it is to be outside when the temperature is near or over 100 degrees.  I am grateful for air conditioned cars and that I finally put central air in my house last summer. Because of it, I stay in as much as I can, but…

    There are dog walks to be taken and “she who won’t be denied” doesn’t mind the heat.  I thought the hot pavement might burn her little feet, but she steps so spritely, I don’t even think she feels it.

  • Unlock nation’s oil and natural gas

    Buried largely beneath the Alaskan tundra and coastal waters is a 145.5 billion-barrel vault of recoverable oil, nearly eight times our measured oil reserves. This does not count our vast supply of untapped oil shale in the Western part of the United States, which a modest estimate places at 800 billion recoverable barrels. Our potential supply of natural gas totals more than 2,000 trillion cubic feet.

    It is widely acknowledged that these resources could satisfy American demand for hundreds of years, if only President Obama would let us use them.

  • Rash of kitchen fires sparks call for safety when using the stove

    Stove fires can create a very scary situation, as well as a costly mistake.

    Roughly 90 percent of the time, they are caused by human error. They tend to be very small at first, but homeowners usually try to douse them using a small fire extinguisher or a bucket of water. However, this confidence in thinking that they can fight a fire this size is what can lead to a situation getting worse, or a person getting seriously injured.

  • Local library taxes are put to good use

     Last week’s News-Democrat included an editorial reprinted from the Lexington Herald Leader. State Auditor Adam Edelen has announced plans to compile an online database that will provide a way for the public to compare tax or fee rates and spending practices of local taxing districts with similar districts around the state.