.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Dick Clark remembered for impact on our youth

    Living for many years in a rural community in the panhandle of Florida, we had no television at all. That meant lots of radio and records; Mother and Daddy dancing in the kitchen to Bing Crosby, Vaughn Monroe, Frankie Laine, Patti  Paige, Nat King Cole, Peggy Lee and others whose names I can’t remember. 

  • Senate’s inaction on transportation budget leads to a special session

    When the General Assembly wrapped up much of its work at the end of last month, there was only one day left in this year’s legislative session.

    Traditionally, this time is spent just considering any vetoes the governor might issue on the bills making it through the House and Senate. This year, however, there was still some unfinished business that had to be addressed, with the most pressing being the state’s road plan and a budget for the Transportation Cabinet. The agenda also included a major initiative to curb prescription drug abuse.

  • Preventing child abuse can aid in battle against drug and alcohol abuse

    April is recognized as National Child Abuse Awareness month. The question might be asked what child abuse has to do with a group like Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County. 

    Every day in the United States, five children die as a result of child abuse, most of which are under the age of 4.  Alcohol and substance abuse are the leading cause of child abuse. 

  • Kentucky cannot afford to wait a year for strong legislation on pill mills

    Editor’s note: This opinion piece comes from mayors of Henderson, Winchester, Hazard, Pikeville, Hopkinsville, Paducah, Paintsville, Crestview Hills and London who are members of the Kentucky League of Cities.

     

    On April 12, lawmakers will assemble for the last day of the 60-day session. While the General Assembly concluded the bulk of its work before leaving Frankfort last Friday, it left one of the most critical pieces of legislation for our state and communities uncompleted.

  • State’s budget reduces agencies’ funding but protects education

    By the time you read this, the 2012 General Assembly will be one day away from concluding.

    We have completed 59 days of the 60 day session, the last day, April 12, is reserved for considering any governor’s vetoes, if any.

     By far, working on the state’s two-year budget was the most pressing issue this week.

    After several late nights, we reached consensus on the $19.4 billion budget with the House negotiators a little before 3 a.m. on Thursday.

  • Lawmakers compromise to OK two-year budget

    When House and Senate leaders first sat down early last week in budget negotiations, most of the major issues had already been decided.

    Each chamber, for example, supported Gov. Steve Beshear’s decision to cut most state agencies by more than 8 percent next fiscal year to balance the books, and then maintain that level of spending in the following year. Both the House and Senate believe it is important to live within our means, and to rely as little as possible on one-time funding sources to cover recurring expenses.

  • Senate passes budget that limits state debt but offers key services

    While we passed several important bills this week, my time was dominated with review of the House’s proposal, House Bill 265, for the state’s two-year budget.

  • House OKs adult, child protections

    Most legislation that the General Assembly passes each year falls in one of two categories: It either protects or it promotes.

    That was especially evident this past week in the Kentucky House of Represen-tatives, which voted for bills that range from further limiting abuse of our youngest and oldest citizens to helping more students in the coalfields of Eastern Kentucky get their four-year college degree.

  • Senate bill would protect religous freedoms, rights

    We are entering the home-stretch of the 2012 General Assembly with the attendant rush of bills as legislators feel the urgency of the dwindling days. The Senate had a very full week with legislation, committee meetings, and we received the budget proposal from the House as well as the state’s road plan. Visits from groups ranging from the AARP to 4-H also came to the capitol to see their legislator and press for their causes.

  • Make donations to aid tornado victims

    By the time you are reading this, more than a week will have passed since the monster tornadoes targeted many of our communities. I want to tell the victims that you are not alone; Kentucky stands with you.