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Columns

  • Senate’s balanced postal reform bill is the best solution

     Now that the U.S. Senate has passed bipartisan S 1789 to reform the ailing U.S. Postal Service, critics are trying to disable the bill on its way to the House. Both postal unions and USPS want more for their side, and some Republicans mistakenly believe the bill burdens taxpayers.

    Unfortunately, Kentucky Senators Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul both bought into that logic and opposed S 1789.

  • ‘Backyard’ concert series features great performers at park

    Because I was an hour early for a lunch date with some friends in Lexington last Friday, I decided to mosey on over to Dillard’s for a bit of retail therapy. As I browsed through the department that carries my size, the person ringing up sales was talking loudly about her Mother’s Day plans, wishing everyone a Happy Mother’s Day and just going on and on. 

  • The EPA is wrong on coal, again

    Since assuming office in 2009, President Obama has piled billions of dollars in unaffordable burdens on electricity generation.  Now his team of regulators at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has launched another misguided assault on coal with no regard for the cost to American families and businesses.

  • Figures show economy appears to be recovering

    Earlier this year, as the General Assembly was putting together the budget to run state government, it was becoming increasingly clear that the state was finally beginning to see some lasting growth.

    That was further confirmed several weeks ago, when one of the state’s economists said that “all signs are pointing to the likelihood that the recovery is here to stay.”

  • Webster remembered for the many things he did for Carrollton

    Many have shared their memories of Charlie Webster this past week and tonight, as I write, I am moved to share mine.

    In a large way, Charlie was Carrollton to me. I first met him as my pharmacist working out of the old drug store on the square, but soon we connected in a much closer way. Both unrepentant Democrats, we shared our experiences and beliefs in that party over the years. Our stories of old-time politics in small Kentucky towns were made real by our memories of our parents and grandparents.

  • Son’s lack of fear displays his courage in an audition

    “I need to borrow your guitar, Dad.”  That was the request of my 8-year old last week. “I’m trying out for the spring talent showcase.”

    I had to interject and remind him that he does not know how to play the guitar — never had a lesson.

    He informed me that he was going to sing a song and also play it on guitar. I didn’t like the idea of sending him to school with my guitar, especially since he doesn’t know how to play guitar. 

  • Dick Clark remembered for impact on our youth

    Living for many years in a rural community in the panhandle of Florida, we had no television at all. That meant lots of radio and records; Mother and Daddy dancing in the kitchen to Bing Crosby, Vaughn Monroe, Frankie Laine, Patti  Paige, Nat King Cole, Peggy Lee and others whose names I can’t remember. 

  • Senate’s inaction on transportation budget leads to a special session

    When the General Assembly wrapped up much of its work at the end of last month, there was only one day left in this year’s legislative session.

    Traditionally, this time is spent just considering any vetoes the governor might issue on the bills making it through the House and Senate. This year, however, there was still some unfinished business that had to be addressed, with the most pressing being the state’s road plan and a budget for the Transportation Cabinet. The agenda also included a major initiative to curb prescription drug abuse.

  • Preventing child abuse can aid in battle against drug and alcohol abuse

    April is recognized as National Child Abuse Awareness month. The question might be asked what child abuse has to do with a group like Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County. 

    Every day in the United States, five children die as a result of child abuse, most of which are under the age of 4.  Alcohol and substance abuse are the leading cause of child abuse. 

  • Kentucky cannot afford to wait a year for strong legislation on pill mills

    Editor’s note: This opinion piece comes from mayors of Henderson, Winchester, Hazard, Pikeville, Hopkinsville, Paducah, Paintsville, Crestview Hills and London who are members of the Kentucky League of Cities.

     

    On April 12, lawmakers will assemble for the last day of the 60-day session. While the General Assembly concluded the bulk of its work before leaving Frankfort last Friday, it left one of the most critical pieces of legislation for our state and communities uncompleted.