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Columns

  • Report offers insight on crashes on highways across Kentucky

    While no one can accurately predict where a traffic accident might occur, information gathered by the Kentucky State Police gives us a pretty good idea of when the odds are certainly in our favor.

    Based on its latest annual report, which was released last week, one of the safest places to be on the highway in 2010 was in a vehicle driven at dawn on a Sunday in March by a woman in her late 60s or early 70s who was making her way between Owensboro and Henderson on the Audubon Parkway.

  • Widening, upgrades needed on Ky.’s I-71

    While there is a debate nationwide on the need for upgrading our highways and bridges, we know we have problems that need to be addressed on this region’s interstate highway.

    Those of us who drive Interstate 71 frequently know the issues. It’s too busy and needs to be six lanes; and those  need to be in much better condition than they are today.

  • Kentuckians have long history of distinguished service in the military

    For most of Kentucky’s history, we have found a way to go above and beyond the call of duty when it comes to protecting our country.

    During the War of 1812, for example, Kentucky suffered more casualties than all other states combined. In the decade since Sept. 11, 2001, meanwhile, no military base has seen more deployments than Fort Campbell.

    Last week, the nation turned its attention to the Kentuckian who became the latest recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, the highest award that anyone in the military can receive.

  • State protects nature preserves

    “Buy land,” Mark Twain once said.  “They’re not making any more of it.”

    That investment advice has been taken to heart by the Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission, which formally celebrated 35 years of service last week.

    Since it began, the commission has permanently set aside more than 25,000 irreplaceable acres for future generations.  Their 60 nature preserves range from the Blanton Forest near Virginia to Three Ponds along the Mississippi River.

  • 9.11 Remembered

    As I write on Sunday evening, Sept. 11, I have spent several hours watching programs devoted to remembering our national tragedy of 10 years ago. I thought I would not forget the events of that day, but I had forgotten so much. Sept. 11, 2001 has now become a part of our country’s history, one we can add to, “I know just where I was on the day I heard President Kennedy had been shot.”

  • State officials remember 9.11

    Paul E. Patton
    Governor of Kentucky (1995-2003)

    In the moments before the first plane hit the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, officials from 18 states had gathered for the annual Southern Governors’ Association conference in Lexington. As governor of Kentucky and chairman of the association, I was hosting the event.

  • 9.11 Remembered

    There are only a handful of days in which an entire nation collectively remembers what it was doing. Some have been high points in our history, like V-E and V-J Day at the end of World War II and Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon. Some have been moments we wish had never occurred, like Pearl Harbor, President Kennedy’s assassination, and the tragedies of Sept. 11, 2001.

    For those old enough to remember that last date, it seems hard to believe that 10 years have slipped by since that cool and clear morning.

  • Library, animal support group offer programs to benefit our community

    After four days of nonstop Irene coverage, I am so glad that the storm was not as dangerous as it might have been. I have friends on the East Coast who boarded up and evacuated and while I have not yet heard from them, I hope they got no worse than lots of rain.

  • ‘I won’t be the one’

    Underage drinking is not just a youth problem. It is very much an adult problem. 

    It is a problem that cannot simply be left up to young people to fix; we as adults must work to correct this problem. After all, the law states that you have to be 21 to purchase alcohol, so they have to be getting it from somewhere. Inconsistent laws in the state of Kentucky send mixed messages to both adults and youth.

  • Committees tackle roads, budget issues

    As the days grow shorter (and hopefully cooler) and the children return to school, it is a good time to review summer activities. In general, the most visible work of the state legislature is during our winter session but committees continue to meet to gain information and review potential legislation during the summer. I am the chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee and I serve on the Appropriations and Revenue Committee, the Economic Development, Tourism, and Labor Committee, and the Natural Resources and Energy Committee as well as several smaller budget subcommittees.