.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • State officials remember 9.11

    Paul E. Patton
    Governor of Kentucky (1995-2003)

    In the moments before the first plane hit the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001, officials from 18 states had gathered for the annual Southern Governors’ Association conference in Lexington. As governor of Kentucky and chairman of the association, I was hosting the event.

  • 9.11 Remembered

    There are only a handful of days in which an entire nation collectively remembers what it was doing. Some have been high points in our history, like V-E and V-J Day at the end of World War II and Neil Armstrong’s first steps on the moon. Some have been moments we wish had never occurred, like Pearl Harbor, President Kennedy’s assassination, and the tragedies of Sept. 11, 2001.

    For those old enough to remember that last date, it seems hard to believe that 10 years have slipped by since that cool and clear morning.

  • Library, animal support group offer programs to benefit our community

    After four days of nonstop Irene coverage, I am so glad that the storm was not as dangerous as it might have been. I have friends on the East Coast who boarded up and evacuated and while I have not yet heard from them, I hope they got no worse than lots of rain.

  • ‘I won’t be the one’

    Underage drinking is not just a youth problem. It is very much an adult problem. 

    It is a problem that cannot simply be left up to young people to fix; we as adults must work to correct this problem. After all, the law states that you have to be 21 to purchase alcohol, so they have to be getting it from somewhere. Inconsistent laws in the state of Kentucky send mixed messages to both adults and youth.

  • Committees tackle roads, budget issues

    As the days grow shorter (and hopefully cooler) and the children return to school, it is a good time to review summer activities. In general, the most visible work of the state legislature is during our winter session but committees continue to meet to gain information and review potential legislation during the summer. I am the chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee and I serve on the Appropriations and Revenue Committee, the Economic Development, Tourism, and Labor Committee, and the Natural Resources and Energy Committee as well as several smaller budget subcommittees.

  • Newspaper for ‘Kids’ ready for fourth year thanks to businesses

    Improving the educational opportunities of our youth is undoubtedly the most important investment we can make.

    There are no limits for young people who have the best education possible.

    To help with their education and to improve literacy, The News-Democrat and local business and industry have joined together to provide our students with their own newspaper.

    The first issue of Carroll County Kids for the new school year went to press this week and will be delivered to students by Sept. 1.

  • State shows progress in ‘going green’ effort

    When it comes to being “green,” Kentucky is taking a leading role in proving that, environmentally speaking, less is really more.

    Our recycling rate, for example, has doubled over the last decade, and in 2008, we passed the national average for the first time. Now, nearly a third of our recyclable materials – such things as aluminum, plastic, glass and paper – are being re-used rather than shipped off to the landfill. Altogether, it amounts to about two million tons annually that are being saved.

  • Welch has contributed a lot to community; will be missed

    I have tried to begin this piece several times and after many false starts, I am determined to get it done today. It’s hard to say goodbye to someone who has been a friend for almost 30 years and, coincidentally, has contributed so much to the community. 

    But we must say farewell to Evelyn Welch, who is leaving at the end of this month to become the manager at William Whitley State Historic Site near Stanford.

  • Diplomas, GEDs have a real payoff

    It has been a little more than a decade since the General Assembly revamped the state’s adult-education programs, a high point in the Legislature’s ongoing efforts to improve the classroom from preschool to the workplace.

    While a lot of work remains, the past decade has been exactly what we had hoped. In fact, from 2005 to 2009, adult-education enrollment grew by 30 percent – faster than any other state over the same period. There are now about 40,000 citizens in Kentucky who are helped academically each year.

  • Together, the community can be a champion against drug and alcohol abuse

    There is an old saying that it takes a village to raise a child. There has probably never been a day and age in which the quote has been more true than now.

    With families needing two or more incomes to survive, the number of families with only one parent, and the number of today’s youth being raised by grandparents and other family members, we need everyone to work together.