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Columns

  • Nation honors veterans’ sacrifices Friday

    As Veterans Day approaches, we recognize the sacrifices made by all our veterans, and thank them for their service to our country.  As your representative and a veteran, I make every effort to make sure the men and women who have served our nation in uniform get the respect, treatment, services and benefits that they deserve.

  • Changes visible after month away; community loses a treasure with Salyers’ death

    I go away for one month and when I get home there are huge silos in Prestonville. I mentioned it to some folks and they didn’t even know about these new structures, but I ran into Judge Tomlinson Friday and he said it’s something to do with grains.  Then I heard soybeans from someone else. So I guess they are grains? I thought they were legumes, but I’m shaky on my agrarian terms.

  • Boyd recounts her experience at Panama City Beach

    Dateline Panama City Beach.  By the time you read your paper I will be back from spending a month down here at my favorite beach.  We lived near here when I was ages ten through seventeen and I have many great memories of family weekends spent looking for shells and riding the waves.

  • Small actions can make a big difference in the community

    "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it’s the only thing that ever has.”

    This quote by anthropologist Margaret Mead was one of my favorites when I was in high school and college because it reminded me that individuals and seemingly small actions can make a big difference in someone’s life. It has been a while since I have read these words, but I think of them now when I reflect on my experience Saturday morning at Project Comfort.

  • Ky.’s first responders make a big difference in everyone’s lives

    They may only number in the tens of thousands out of a state of more than 4.3 million people, but it isn’t hard to imagine how much more difficult life would be without our first responders.

    While their work is mainly a function of local government, the state plays a role as well in helping law enforcement, firefighters and other emergency workers do their job.

  • State makes progress on educational goals

    When the General Assembly overhauled the state’s postsecondary system in 1997, it set some ambitious goals to reach by the year 2020.

    Last month, the Council on Postsecondary Education gave us an update on just how far we have come since then – and how much further we need to go in the next few years to stay on track.

  • Magazines played an important role in life beginning in childhood

    I heard Tom Brokaw speaking on television the other day and he talked of knowing about certain events as a child because his family subscribed to Life Magazine. 

    It made me think of all the magazines that have been a part of my life.

    My family was not, in retrospect, very sophisticated.  We lived in a rural area; we went to ‘the city’ for the Ice Capades, the zoo, school clothes, and to see Santa on the sixth floor of Shillitos. But we were readers of two daily newspapers most of the time and some popular magazines of the day.

  • Office assists with Capitol visit plans

    Are you planning a visit to Washington, D.C.?  Whether you are coming on a school trip, family vacation or business trip, my office can help you make arrangements for some of the more popular attractions and landmarks in our nation’s capital.  We are available to help you reserve tours of the U.S. Capitol Building, Pentagon, and White House.  These tours are an excellent way to see the highlights of Washington at no charge to you.

  • State nature preserves land, water, wildlife

    “Buy land,” Mark Twain once said.  “They’re not making any more of it.”

    That investment advice has been taken to heart by the Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission, which formally celebrated 35 years of service last week.

    Since it began, the commission has permanently set aside more than 25,000 irreplaceable acres for future generations.  Their 60 nature preserves range from the Blanton Forest near Virginia to Three Ponds along the Mississippi River.

  • Report offers insight on crashes on highways across Kentucky

    While no one can accurately predict where a traffic accident might occur, information gathered by the Kentucky State Police gives us a pretty good idea of when the odds are certainly in our favor.

    Based on its latest annual report, which was released last week, one of the safest places to be on the highway in 2010 was in a vehicle driven at dawn on a Sunday in March by a woman in her late 60s or early 70s who was making her way between Owensboro and Henderson on the Audubon Parkway.