.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • State’s budget reduces agencies’ funding but protects education

    By the time you read this, the 2012 General Assembly will be one day away from concluding.

    We have completed 59 days of the 60 day session, the last day, April 12, is reserved for considering any governor’s vetoes, if any.

     By far, working on the state’s two-year budget was the most pressing issue this week.

    After several late nights, we reached consensus on the $19.4 billion budget with the House negotiators a little before 3 a.m. on Thursday.

  • Lawmakers compromise to OK two-year budget

    When House and Senate leaders first sat down early last week in budget negotiations, most of the major issues had already been decided.

    Each chamber, for example, supported Gov. Steve Beshear’s decision to cut most state agencies by more than 8 percent next fiscal year to balance the books, and then maintain that level of spending in the following year. Both the House and Senate believe it is important to live within our means, and to rely as little as possible on one-time funding sources to cover recurring expenses.

  • Senate passes budget that limits state debt but offers key services

    While we passed several important bills this week, my time was dominated with review of the House’s proposal, House Bill 265, for the state’s two-year budget.

  • House OKs adult, child protections

    Most legislation that the General Assembly passes each year falls in one of two categories: It either protects or it promotes.

    That was especially evident this past week in the Kentucky House of Represen-tatives, which voted for bills that range from further limiting abuse of our youngest and oldest citizens to helping more students in the coalfields of Eastern Kentucky get their four-year college degree.

  • Senate bill would protect religous freedoms, rights

    We are entering the home-stretch of the 2012 General Assembly with the attendant rush of bills as legislators feel the urgency of the dwindling days. The Senate had a very full week with legislation, committee meetings, and we received the budget proposal from the House as well as the state’s road plan. Visits from groups ranging from the AARP to 4-H also came to the capitol to see their legislator and press for their causes.

  • Make donations to aid tornado victims

    By the time you are reading this, more than a week will have passed since the monster tornadoes targeted many of our communities. I want to tell the victims that you are not alone; Kentucky stands with you.

  • Photos of the past needed for book on Carroll County

    When I was a kid, I wasn’t all that interested in history. It was one of those subjects that never really caught my imagination. I think that’s true of most people; when you are young, everything seems like ancient history – even if it happened only a few years before you were born.

  • House approves 2012-13 budget based on governor’s spending plan

    For the last several years, the biggest challenge facing the General Assembly and Governor Beshear has been keeping the state on track as it weathers the toughest worldwide recession in more than 70 years.

  • Senate passes bills on safety issues

    Another week goes by in a whirl of legislative meetings, visits from hometown folks and organized groups such as 4-H and the 874K Coalition. Even though the House has yet to act on the budget proposal, senators continue to educate ourselves and monitor the budget meetings in the House. In addition, senators continue to meet in small groups to review the different budget needs of the various agencies. We expect to receive the House proposal next week.

  • House OKs measures to stop illegal drug sales, use in Kentucky

    As it normally does during the first full week of March in even-numbered years, the Kentucky House of Representatives will vote on its proposed budget this week to run state government.