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Columns

  • Newspaper for ‘Kids’ ready for fourth year thanks to businesses

    Improving the educational opportunities of our youth is undoubtedly the most important investment we can make.

    There are no limits for young people who have the best education possible.

    To help with their education and to improve literacy, The News-Democrat and local business and industry have joined together to provide our students with their own newspaper.

    The first issue of Carroll County Kids for the new school year went to press this week and will be delivered to students by Sept. 1.

  • State shows progress in ‘going green’ effort

    When it comes to being “green,” Kentucky is taking a leading role in proving that, environmentally speaking, less is really more.

    Our recycling rate, for example, has doubled over the last decade, and in 2008, we passed the national average for the first time. Now, nearly a third of our recyclable materials – such things as aluminum, plastic, glass and paper – are being re-used rather than shipped off to the landfill. Altogether, it amounts to about two million tons annually that are being saved.

  • Welch has contributed a lot to community; will be missed

    I have tried to begin this piece several times and after many false starts, I am determined to get it done today. It’s hard to say goodbye to someone who has been a friend for almost 30 years and, coincidentally, has contributed so much to the community. 

    But we must say farewell to Evelyn Welch, who is leaving at the end of this month to become the manager at William Whitley State Historic Site near Stanford.

  • Diplomas, GEDs have a real payoff

    It has been a little more than a decade since the General Assembly revamped the state’s adult-education programs, a high point in the Legislature’s ongoing efforts to improve the classroom from preschool to the workplace.

    While a lot of work remains, the past decade has been exactly what we had hoped. In fact, from 2005 to 2009, adult-education enrollment grew by 30 percent – faster than any other state over the same period. There are now about 40,000 citizens in Kentucky who are helped academically each year.

  • Together, the community can be a champion against drug and alcohol abuse

    There is an old saying that it takes a village to raise a child. There has probably never been a day and age in which the quote has been more true than now.

    With families needing two or more incomes to survive, the number of families with only one parent, and the number of today’s youth being raised by grandparents and other family members, we need everyone to work together. 

  • Signs point to improving economy

    There have been several positive signs in recent months that the worst of the recession may finally be behind us, but perhaps the best indication yet for Kentucky came late last week. That’s when Gov. Steve Beshear announced that state government ended the just-completed fiscal year with nearly $157 million more than expected.

  • Many students work hard during the summer

    For many students, the end of the school year does not mean an end to time spent with a teacher.

    In fact, hundreds work as hard during summer vacation as they do during the rest of the year. Two of the most popular programs Kentucky offers are Governor’s Scholars and the Governor’s School for the Arts, both of which give select high school students a chance to spend several weeks on a college campus with others as driven as they are.

  • Transportation systems make Kentucky the ‘heart’ of the U.S.

    One of the Commonwealth’s most famous authors, Jesse Stuart, once wrote that “if these United States can be called a body, Kentucky can be called its heart.”

    He was referring to more than just our location, of course, but his words have proven prophetic in a geographic sense as well. It turns out that our literal place in the world is a great place to be when it comes to helping the world get what it needs.

  • A volunteer experiences race mania

    I spent a good part of Saturday at the Kentucky Speedway as a volunteer for the Carroll County Animal Support Group. Our volunteers manned the tram stops Friday evening and from 8 a.m. till 9 p.m. Saturday. 

    It was an easy job, but oh so hot. I must say, I have never seen people work so hard to have fun.

  • Don’t miss the next First Friday program

    There was a good crowd on the Courthouse Square for First Friday this weekend. I think it is one of the really nice things about our small town, and try not to ever miss that special evening. 

    Local farmers and some craftser display their goods. Carrollton Main Street Program furnishes ice water or (this past week) snow cones, while the Carroll County Fair Board or some other group usually fixes sandwiches.

    Lucky individuals get to try their hand(s) at the cash cube.Talented individuals win at cooking or photography contests.