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Columns

  • Prom photos rekindle memories of special times in our own lives

    Seeing the beautiful pictures of the prom-goers in last week’s News-Democrat prompted some of us who participate in the walking program at the public library every weekday morning to reminisce about our own proms – back in the day.

    I went to high school in Marianna, Fla., a town of about 6,500 in the Panhandle. Our class had about 200 members and one of the reasons we looked forward to our junior year was that it was our year to put on the prom. Our committee planned for months and decorated for days once we had decided on a theme.

  • Horses, military, flooding garner attention for state

    Over the past week or so, Kentucky has gained national attention in not one but three distinct ways.

    The Kentucky Derby is perhaps the most obvious, and Saturday’s race more than maintained its reputation as the best two minutes in sports. The day before, meanwhile, Fort Campbell was the fitting location for the nation to pay tribute to those heroic soldiers who brought justice to Osama bin Laden.

  • Consider donations as spring cleaning gets under way

    With spring comes spring cleaning.  The Carroll County Public Library provides a service that can assist you with this process. 

    We accept donations.  The staff would revolt if I did not clarify this just a little bit. We accept gently used books, magazines, DVDs and music CDs that have been stored indoors. We don’t mean to be picky, but we don’t like the critters that usually come with items that have been kept in storage units or sheds. 

  • Beware: Bed bugs can strike anywhere

    It’s been a while since I have written one of my occasional columns, but now that it appears my long domestic nightmare is over, I sit down to write this one as a public service announcement.

    I have been fighting the battle of the bed bugs. Yes, bed bugs. How or where did I get them?  The movies? Restaurants? Waiting rooms at the doctors’ offices or hospital?  Who knows, but I had them.

  • To the rescue

    Anyone who has been around me very much knows I like to plan. And that’s exactly what we do each year as the group of us on the Carrollton Main Street Promotions Committee prepare for the Easter on the Square event.

    We have it all mapped out — from the arrival of the Easter Bunny through the prize drawings after the egg hunt at the end of the day.

    I learned Saturday that any plan can be quickly adapted based on circumstances.

  • Census guides changes in districts

    About a year after George Washington was elected President, Congress decided that one of the country’s first orders of business was finding out just how many lived here.

    It declared that Aug. 2, 1790, would be Census Day, and those in charge of counting were called upon to include not only the original 13 colonies but also several other districts that would later become states, including Kentucky. What the numbers showed is that, just 15 years after Daniel Boone blazed the Wilderness Road through Cumberland Gap, 74,000 people were already calling Kentucky home.

  • Ghent facility served as college, public school

    Bill Davis shared this history of Ghent College and Ghent School with The News-Democrat after the structure was destryoed by fire Sunday. Davis researched this for the “Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky.”

    Ghent College in Carroll County, Ky., was founded in 1867, when local citizens led by James Frank formed a corporation creating a private nonsectarian college for white students at Ghent. A three-story brick college building was built on the western edge of town the following year, at a cost of $31,700.

  • Carrollton still waits for states to build a bridge to Indiana

    While the Milton-Madison Bridge was in the planning and early construction stages in 1928 there was talk of building yet another bridge spanning the Ohio River at Carrollton. Among the movers and shakers behind the proposed span was Joseph Lyter Donaldson, Carroll County attorney at the time. Donaldson would, in the years to come, serve as chairman of the state highway commission and was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for governor in 1943.

  • Veto deal on Medicaid plan ‘is wrong’

    The state Senate adjourned Thursday night having signed the Senate Committee Substitute to House Bill 1, legislation to resolve the Medicaid budget shortfall. Without even a need for a conference committee, the bill passed the House of Representatives overwhelmingly with only two no votes.

  • House move averts Medicaid shortfall

    During the legislative session that ended earlier this month, Kentuckians saw a textbook example of what positive things can happen when both parties in the General Assembly come together and work toward the Commonwealth’s greater good.

    The end result was a landmark law that stands as the biggest change to our criminal code since it was overhauled in the mid-1970s. It showed just how effective the legislative process could be when everyone has a seat at the table and a desire to do something truly meaningful.