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Columns

  • Bill would shut down the federal Department of Education by 2019

    Should a presidential appointee and an army of bureaucrats in a remote office building thousands of miles away decide what values, morals and ideas to instill in your children? I think not. Of all the harmful things our government in Washington, D.C., does, micromanaging education is perhaps the worst.

  • Casey’s law can be an effective tool to combat the growing drug problem

    It seems as though lately our newspapers are riddled with the wreckage that drug addiction brings to our families and our community. The obituary section is full of depictions of lives ended way too early. The public record section is riddled with stories of people charged with drug possession or drug-related crimes. Our jails are full, children are left dependent, neglected and abused, and the morgues are busier than ever before. No one can deny the impact that drugs are having on our county, state and nation.

  • Advocates say First Amendment can withstand President Trump’s attacks

    By HILLEL ITALIE

    AP National Writer

    Whenever Donald Trump fumes about “fake news” or labels the press “the enemy of the people,” First Amendment scholar David L. Hudson Jr. hears echoes of other presidents — but a breadth and tone that are entirely new.

    Trump may not know it, but it was Thomas Jefferson who once said, “Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper,” said Hudson, a law professor at Vanderbilt University.

  • Media groups push back after fake news defined US elections

    By AREK SARKISSIAN

    USA TODAY Network

    The Baltimore Gazette had its share of scoops leading up to the 2016 presidential election. But one stands out: Every presidential race since John F. Kennedy’s election was rigged.

    That blockbuster story spread quickly across social media, with readers praising the Gazette for having the guts to report “the truth.”

  • Against Democrats’ objections, House OKs charter schools bill

    Through a series of extreme parliamentary maneuvers that kept teachers and other interested Kentuckians from effectively voicing their concerns, the House Majority forced a vote on the “charter schools” bill Friday in an early morning committee meeting, before rushing the measure to the House floor where it passed on a 56-39 vote.

  • Session moves quickly as Senate approves bills

    Late nights, packed committee meetings, and heated debate marked the fifth week of the 2017 Session. The Senate is quickly passing the remaining Senate bills out and receiving bills from the House for consideration. While there were some contested issues, the Senate conducted itself in a bipartisan fashion. We wasted no time this week and passed over 40 pieces of legislation including:

    • Senate Bill 9, redistricting of judicial districts in order to better align caseloads with current census data;

  • Four reasons you are not dropping body fat

    On Instagram and Facebook you always see trainers asked about stubborn body fat and how they recommend getting rid of it. The reality is that there are so many variables to answer with a question like this it is tough to give one straight answer. What can be done for you is give four very common reasons why so many people fail to lose body fat effectively. 

    Lack of tracking

  • Bill makes legislators’ pensions public

    Visits from advocacy groups, a ceremonial bill signing, and rallies in the Capitol Rotunda, along with the bipartisan passage of bills, marked a busy Week Four of the 2017 Legislative Session. We were excited to welcome the children of Kentucky National Guard members from across the state for the First Annual Kentucky Military Kids Day. It was an honor to host these families who have sacrificed so much to serve our state and our country.

  • Session produces record number of bills, some winners, some losers

    We passed the half-way point of our 30-day session this week and accrued some historic stats along the way.

    A combined total of 793 bills were filed in the House and Senate this year. That’s the second-highest amount for an odd-year regular session and just two bills shy of the 795 bills filed in 2007.

  • Kentucky Afield Radio now broadcast in Carrollton area

    The calculator must be wrong. But 2017 minus 1981 does equal the number of years I’ve been in broadcasting. Funny how 36 years seem like yesterday. For radio, there was no better place to start than where I did. And, ultimately, no better place to finish.