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Columns

  • Flag Day deserves to be recognized

    Flag Day commemorates the official adoption of the Stars and Stripes as our national symbol, an action taken by the Second Continental Congress on June 14, 1777.

    Usually this isn’t much of a holiday. Stores are busy, federal and state offices are open, and the US Postal Service runs the mail. Come June 14 each year, the vast majority of Americans probably have no idea that a holiday is being observed.

    I believe Flag Day deserves better. So let’s pause for just a minute to reflect on why.

  • Social media posts can have real life repercussions

    Technology has become one of those buzzwords that can mean a lot of different things or nothing really at all. It is interesting that we have such words in our language. I love it when someone answers a question with a very lengthy, high in vocabulary sentence, but when you break it down they really did not say much at all. I think technology has fallen into that category.

  • Thank veterans, first responders for their service

    At the base of the United States Marine Corps. War Memorial–also known as the Iwo Jima Memorial–there is a quote from World War II Admiral Chester Nimitz. The admiral said, “Uncommon valor was a common virtue.”

  • Who pays for fish and wildlife conservation?

    As Co-Chair of the Kentucky Legislative Sportsmen’s Caucus, I find it fitting to take a moment to extend an enormous debt of gratitude to our hunters and anglers. The critical contributions that these sportsmen and women make to our economy and professional fish and wildlife management in the Bluegrass State ensure that we will enjoy access to our hunting and angling traditions now and into the future. 

  • Massie: Don’t tax Social Security benefits

    On May 19, I re-introduced the Senior Citizens Tax Elimination Act (H.R. 2552). This bill would assist our struggling middle class by eliminating an unnecessary and unjust double-tax on seniors.

  • Bunning one of a kind lately out of production

    By TIM SULLIVAN

    Courier-Journal

    Ted Williams ripped off his shirt without bothering with the buttons. The great Boston slugger was so steamed at striking out three times in a single game that he began plotting his revenge before leaving the locker room.

    “He walked over to the schedule on the wall, ran his finger down until he came to the next Detroit series,” recalled Gene Mauch, then a Red Sox infielder.

    Finding the date, Williams made a vow.

  • State lawmakers enact legislation to assist, support our veterans

     When I try to think of everything our military men and women have given us as Americans, I quickly realize the error of my ways. It’s impossible to account for everything our military men and women have done for us. From those first moments in the battle for freedom on colonial soil to the deserts of the Middle East today, their amazing acts of selflessness for this nation has been constant.

  • Franklin shares info on bath salts, synthetic marijuana

    This month, I’d like to give readers a bit more insight on two topics you may know little about: bath salts and synthetic marijuana. These were two items among synthetic drugs that we are to report on through The Office of National Drug Control Policy, in order to keep our coalition updated. You may have heard of these drugs and did not realize they are deadly. With hard drugs running rampant in the streets, it is easy to put these in the back of your minds but they are in fact deadly.

  • Honoring heroics 51 years after fact

    The News-Enterprise

    Some debts never can be repaid.

    A 71-year-old Hodgenville man was guest of honor at a surprise party recently coordinated by a group of elderly men who owe their long lives to his awareness, bravery and service.

    After 51 years, members of a Vietnam-era squadron of U.S. Marines finally were able to thank Don Medley.

    During a surprise gathering at Stone Hearth restaurant, Medley recounted the day he was flying over a rice paddy and noticed Marines advancing toward a trench line holding enemy forces.

  • Support our military on Memorial Day

    Patriotism is a virtue that makes our country great. That is why we set aside specific days on our calendar to honor fallen soldiers, remember our military veterans, and celebrate American history.

    One of those days is Memorial Day, which we celebrate this upcoming weekend.