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Columns

  • Don't let Christmas challenges take over

    Kentucky New Era

    In its truest form, Christmas time is gracious. We make more time for family. We take stock of what we’ve gained and lost during the year. We count our blessings and seek connection to people who matter the most in our lives. We tell people we are grateful, and we tell them why. We say, “I love you” more. We share gifts, food and money with strangers.

    All of these experiences happen because religious rituals and secular traditions combine to bring out a lot of kindness in people.

  • Control the burn: Tame the fire of inflammation, improve your health, physique

    Inflammation has been tied to everything from heart disease and cancer to lingering muscle soreness that lasts for days after an intense workout, a phenomenon known as delayed onset muscle soreness. Though many people see inflammation as a cumbersome roadblock to good health and a better body, it has its own Jekyll-and-Hyde personality. A little acute inflammation is good, but too much chronic inflammation is a huge red flag letting you know that something is wrong.

  • Legislature prepares for new session

    With Thanksgiving behind us and Christmas and New Year’s Eve fast approaching, the General Assembly is winding down what it calls the interim and is preparing for the 2016 legislative session, which will start on Jan. 5, and last for 60 working days.

    Although it is impossible to predict what ultimately will become law, we are getting a clearer idea of the major topics that will be debated.

  • Deadline upcoming for Congress

    Will Dec. 11, mark another déjà vu moment for Congress?  This looming deadline is the day by which Congress must once again fund the federal government for the upcoming fiscal year. 

  • Rand discusses Thanksgiving holiday traditions nationwide

    This week, our family and friends will gather around the dinner table as they have for generations to celebrate a holiday that is nearing its 400th anniversary.

    As even some of our youngest students can tell us, what is widely considered to be America’s first Thanksgiving took place in 1621, when the Pilgrims and a tribe of Native Americans came together for a three-day feast to give thanks for a successful harvest.

  • Watch out for banking thieves this season

    Kentucky New Era

    The holiday shopping season can make or break many retailers each year, including some in our own community, but it is also a potential bonanza for criminals who prey on busy consumers.

    It is the season of giving — and unfortunately, it is the time for taking.

  • Some things never change

    Many of the best things in life are simple. Take Thanksgiving, for example. Lacking the costumes of Halloween and the parties of New Year’s, Thanksgiving requires only two ingredients: food and family. As a celebratory month, November does not need presents, egg hunts or fireworks. It is a simple thing.

  • Study finds education pays – In many more ways than one

    In the late 1990s, the state rolled out a simple but effective campaign summarized by two words: “Education pays.”

    That popular slogan came on the heels of a landmark overhaul of our public postsecondary schools and the creation of such programs as KEES, the lottery-based college scholarships that high school students earn with good grades, and “Bucks for Brains,” which added hundreds of millions of state and private dollars to our university research budgets.

  • Exercise to beat the wintertime blues

    Seasonal Depression Order (also called SAD) is a type of depression that is triggered by the seasons of the year. Symptoms usually begin late fall and early winter. The most common type of SAD is called winter onset depression. More than a half a million Americans experience a winter depression, but are better come summer. 

    The following are common symptoms of SAD:

    • a change in appetite, especially craving sweets or starchy foods

    •  weight gain

    • drop in energy level

  • Library collecting donations to local organizations in lieu of fines

    A switch flipped on Nov. 1. It officially became the holiday season. After Halloween was over, Christmas trees were going up. It has been so prevalent in advertisements and social media that I began to have panic attacks that I was not ready. I have to remind myself that there is plenty of time to have a great holiday season. There is so much pressure on us to create the most “Pinterest-worthy” moments that we might forget to stop and enjoy the time.