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Columns

  • Senators tackle bills on illegal drugs, nurse practitoners, more

    The second week of the 2014 Regular Session brought schedules packed with meetings, rallies, press conferences and hearings on bills. We met with constituents, citizen groups and fellow lawmakers as we began vetting proposed legislation.

  • House lawmakers eye giving felons back their right to vote

    Last week, the House of Representatives turned its attention to two issues that may not seem to have much in common but are linked nonetheless because of the positive impact both could have on a significant number of Kentuckians.

    The first vote came early in the week, when the chamber put its support behind the creation of public benefit corporations. As its name implies, this legal designation would give private businesses a chance to better verify their commitment to serving, not just their customers, but their community as well.

  • Early college offers credit for students while in high school

    The Early College Program is a partnership between Carroll County High School and JCTC. It is open to juniors and seniors who have achieved “college ready” status by hitting benchmarks in English, reading and math on the ACT or Compass assessments.


  • Take the challenge next week, test knowledge of drug facts

    At Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County, we like to celebrate. We celebrate living a drug-free life and we celebrate when those who need treatment and direction are able to reach out.

    We also like to celebrate when education and prevention reach lives of young individuals who need it most.

    From Jan. 27 through Feb. 1, we will be celebrating “National Drug Facts Week.” This is a week of education and prevention within Carroll County Schools, a week celebrated nationwide.

  • It’s time for state smoking ban

    Fifty years ago, the U.S. Surgeon General issued the first government report linking smoking to health risks such as lung cancer.

    “Cigarette smoking is a health hazard of sufficient importance in the United States to warrant appropriate remedial action,” the report urged in its conclusion.

    Some of those remedies have yet to appear half a century on.

  • Lawmakers begin work in Frankfort

    The first week or two of a legislative session may seem slow at first glance, but that doesn’t diminish the importance of these opening days.

    That’s because this is the time when legislators and the governor alike lay out their priorities, setting the stage for what we hope can be accomplished by the time we finish our work, which this year will be on April 15.

  • Senate majority selects its top five issues for upcoming session

    My best regards to you and your family for the New Year. I know many enjoyed a little rest and relaxation as 2013 came to a close.  The holidays are behind us now, and we strive to get back into our daily routines. School is back in session and the work of the year is in full swing.

  • Library embarks on 365-day photo project, staff volunteering at Winn

    Have you ever wondered what 365 days looks like to the average Carroll Countian? We have had many art exhibits at the Library over the years, but starting on January 1, 2014, we began curating one of the largest art displays we have put together.

    The staff at the Carroll County Public Library is going to document what a year looks like from our perspective. These could be pictures from the library, the community or our own personal lives.

  • Census record offers clues to uncover maiden name

    Finding the family name of a female ancestor can be very challenging, no matter what era you are researching. If you are lucky, your female ancestor was young enough to be living with her family in 1850 and later. The 1850 census was the first time enumerators recorded the name, age and birthplace of each person living in every household, along with the relationship they had to the head of household.

    Prior to that, only the name of the head of household was provided. Every-one else was counted according to age and gender.

  • More education money starts with tax reform

     From The News Enterprise, Elizabethtown, Ky.

     

    Teachers are spending money out of their own paychecks each year to make sure all of their students have necessary classroom items that many families take for granted.

    Parents are checking off long lists each August for some essential school supplies. The list and the cost continue to grow with each academic year.

    Students are asked to share school books with classmates and teachers’ salaries rank below the national average.