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Columns

  • Food & Farm Freedom: Open the markets to small farms, producers

    In 2011, federal agents launched a sting operation on an Amish farmer.  Prof. Baylen J. Linnekin provides details of the raid:

    “Federal agents watched the home closely for a year, gathering evidence.  Then, in a pre-dawn raid, armed members from three agencies swooped in.

  • Study finds more Ky. students taking, passing AP tests last year than in 2011

    It may still be early in the school year, but some of the “report cards” the state uses to measure academic progress have already begun to arrive.

    In general, the news for Kentucky is good, although there is still much room for improvement.

    Perhaps the best example of that can be found in the growing number of high school students taking and passing Advanced Placement tests, which provide college credit if the score is high enough.

  • Champions plans to continue mission
  • Early Childhood provides Kindergarten-Readiness support for youngsters

    In older times, many children did not begin learning to read until they started school, and “starting school” meant going to first grade. Everyone did not attend kindergarten, and all-day kindergarten was a rarity indeed. Preschool was almost unheard of.

    Contrast this with today’s emphasis on early learning, and it is clear that many things have changed.

  • Stress: Fact of life, fact of fat

    For most of us, stress is a fact of life. Unfortunately, research reveals that it is also a fact of fat.

  • Constitution Day recognized on Sept. 17

    It may not be celebrated as much as Independence Day, but Constitution Day is arguably just as important.  While the Fourth of July recognizes the birth of our nation, Sept. 17, commemorates the day we established the cornerstone of our government and secured our rights as citizens.

    In the 228 years since that journey began, the U.S. Constitution has become the oldest charter among the world’s major countries and still remains, at 4,400 words, the shortest.

  • State festivals celebrate heritage and traditions

    While the temperature outside may not feel like fall just yet, many of the traditional signs of the season are starting to arrive.

    One of the most telling is the sheer number of festivals that has already started to take place and will run through Halloween.  They are centered on items you might expect - tobacco, apples and bourbon - and a few more that may seem odd until their history is known.

  • Presidential race so far reads like a novel

    By JIM PAXTON

    The Paducah Sun

    The 2016 presidential race is shaping up as one of the most interesting, and to some extent bizarre, such exercises we can remember. It takes place against a backdrop of a public that is in an increasingly foul mood. A poll released Monday by Rasmussen Reports finds that only 26 percent of Americans believe the country is headed in the right direction. That’s down a point from a week earlier and down four points from the start of this year.

  • Gee highlights Big Brothers Big Sisters fundraiser Oct. 8

    Dawne Gee is coming to Carrollton!

    As if her love for Jesus and James Taylor is not reason enough to appreciate Dawne Gee of WAVE-3 News, she is adjusting her schedule to be in Carrollton for our Big Brothers Big Sisters fundraiser dinner on Oct. 8.

  • Rand highlights some of the state’s many woman pioneers

    Last week, the United States celebrated the 95th anniversary of women’s right to vote, a milestone made possible by the passage of the 19th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

    Kentucky was the 23rd state to ratify that amendment, but it did not clear its final legislative hurdle until Tennessee became the 36th in August 1920.  Interestingly, that decision was a close one, occurring only when a young legislator voted in favor at the request of his mother.