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Today's Opinions

  • Be smart, do not fall prey to the scams of thieves and bandits

    Despite the horror stories I read on Facebook, the tales told on the six o’clock news and the countless people that come through my office, it still amazes me that people still fall prey to scams and schemes of thieves and bandits.

    I am not talking about a guy in a mask holding people at gunpoint and taking their money. The modern day thief is much more clever than this and his identity is quite different from what we once held in our minds as the image of a robber.

  • Lawmakers should support supplemental pay increases for police and firefighters

    Bowling Green Daily News

    At a time when police agencies are finding it difficult to recruit qualified candidates to become officers and local municipalities are cash-strapped, a piece of proposed legislation that would permanently increase state supplemental incentives for law enforcement officers, firefighters and volunteer fire departments shows real promise in helping retain and recruit officers and firefighters and in providing money to assist volunteer fire departments with equipment purchases.

  • Diabetes: Plan ahead for home and being on the road

    For people with diabetes, even a traffic jam can turn into a life-threatening emergency — which is why it’s so important to have an action plan in place.

    The first step: Create a labeled, easy-to-grab emergency kit where you can stash your contact information, medications, testing supplies, food, water, and a source of glucose. The following tips will help you handle any diabetes emergency.

  • Scouting food drive proves successful

    Editor:

    A huge thanks to Carroll County community for your generosity with the 2016 Scouting for Food Drive. The Carroll County Schools’ students and staff turned in another stellar effort with 14,997 items donated. Special thanks to the Carroll County School administration for their continued support of this effort, without their support our overall totals would be significantly reduced.

  • To fully experience Thanksgiving, remember to count your blessings

    The experience of a traditional Thanksgiving experience was introduced to me by marriage.

    Actually, I had seen it played out on television with the head of the house carving a giant bird surrounded by the adoring sitcom family with each innoxious remark punctuated by canned laughter.

    But I have no childhood memory of experiencing the giant meal. What I recall was Dad working a double shift at the plant in Louisville so others could be off.

  • Be thankful for, and keep protecting, your blessings

    In a tradition familiar to many, on Thanksgiving I will sit down with loved ones and we will take turns giving thanks for the blessings in our lives. We know who we are by what we hold dear.

    I recently had the privilege of sitting down with leaders from diverse groups across Kentucky and learning what they are grateful for. Made up of working families, teachers and students, faith communities, vulnerable Kentuckians and more, they are grateful for things I thought worth sharing. They have given me permission to share them with you.

  • Thanksgiving holiday has ties to Kentucky

    This week, our families and friends will sit down at the dinner table to celebrate Thanksgiving, the oldest of the American-based holidays.

    Nearly 400 years have passed since the most famous of these harvest feasts was held by the Pilgrims and Native Americans. It didn’t become the holiday we recognize today, though, until President Washington and then President Lincoln helped solidify its place on the calendar, which Congress finalized in the 1940s by declaring it to always be on the fourth Thursday of November.

  • Don’t take our water resources for granted

    FRANKFORT – Other than during a rare boil-water advisory, most of us don’t think twice when we turn on the faucet. We just expect clean and plentiful water to be there.

    For about 95 percent of Kentuckians, that’s exactly what we get each and every day from the 400-plus public and community water systems that serve the commonwealth.  These systems meet or exceed health-based standards at an incredible rate of 99.73 percent.