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Today's Opinions

  • Rushed pension bill pushed through in sewage legislation

    Of all the facts and figures surrounding the public-pension debate, two speak volumes about what happened last Thursday at the Capitol: nine and 291.

    The first is about how many hours it took for House and Senate leaders to publicly unveil their plan to reform the state’s public retirement systems and then steamroll it through both chambers.  The second, meanwhile, is the number of pages other legislators and I were somehow expected to read and understand before voting in that short timeframe.

  • Pension bill harms those it affects

    Editor:

    Kentucky Retirement Systems stakeholders are shocked and appalled by the actions of the General Assembly regarding public pensions. Last week, in the space of about nine hours, the majority party produced a 291-page pension bill and voted it out of the House and Senate. Senate Bill 151 awaits Gov. Matt Bevin’s signature.

  • Legislature takes steps to secure pensions with passage of reform bill on Thursday

    The 2018 Session is quickly winding down as Thursday, March 29, marked Day 57 of the 60-day budget session. Budget negotiations are continuing with positive results, and the Senate gaveled in for two days to pass a number of bills including some aimed at helping our first responders and their families. Although the amount of days left is shortening, the days in the Capitol are getting longer as we prepare to pass the Commonwealth’s two-year budget.

  • Budget differences still need work in home stretch of session

    The General Assembly’s top priority this legislative session – adopting a two-year budget to run state government – entered its final stages late last week, when House and Senate leaders sat down Friday morning to begin looking for common ground that both chambers could support.

    While there are a lot of similarities between the two spending plans, there are still some considerable differences.

  • Senate passes its version of the budget; Hornback outlines other bills

    Rapidly nearing the last days of the 2018 Regular Session, the Senate passed our version of the state budget that contained no new taxes during the 12th week. The Executive Branch Budget, contained in House Bill 200, put an emphasis on public safety by investing in law enforcement, the state crime lab, frontline social workers, and foster and adoption services.

  • Hornback outlines bills Senate passed

    As we draw closer to the end of the 2018 Regular Session, there has been no shortage of movement on significant bills in Frankfort this week. The Senate Appropriations and Revenue Committee has spent several days and some late nights working on the Senate’s budget proposal, which we expect to go before the committee early next week.

  • Marsy’s Law would keep crime victims better informed on their case; on November ballot

    Since each has generated countless news stories and social media posts, it’s certainly understandable if the public thinks this year’s legislative session is just about the state budget and possible reforms of our public retirement systems.

    While the fate of those bills is what will ultimately be remembered most from the General Assembly’s time in the Capitol this year, that shouldn’t overshadow the many other issues that the House and Senate are also considering.  They may not be as far-reaching, but they will have an impact just the same.

  • Students learn the consequences of drugs

    At the end of March community partners in Carroll County hold an event called Truth and Consequences. The event is a program that derived from Kentucky’s Cooperative Extension Service in Clinton County, Ky. and is used in many counties across the state. This year Carroll County’s Extension Office partnered up with Carroll County Schools, Youth Services, Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County and other organizations to bring a community- and school-based event.