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Today's Opinions

  • Wild pigs, chemicals used in schools, child obesity among bills before House

    While no one can predict exactly what will pass in a regular legislative session, one constant can always be counted on: Diversity. Last week was a textbook example of that in action in the Kentucky House, with legislation ranging from wild pigs to alternative energy projects.

  • Show support for the clean energy bill

    Editor:

    The Clean Energy Opportunity Act (HB167) is currently being considered by the Kentucky House of Representatives during the General Assembly. This bill encourages greater energy efficiency, conservation and use of all energy resources in order to gain energy independence and encourage economic growth. It also will enable Kentucky to be a leader in renewable energy alternatives to stabilize energy costs and create jobs for our commonwealth.

  • Senate approves education bills, prepares to work on Ky. budget

    We are now a quarter way through session. Bills are flowing through the committee process and arriving on the Senate floor for consideration before the entire chamber.

     Three bills won passage this week and will now head to the House of Represent-atives. Senate Bill 55 allows for interstate mutual aid agreements among first-responders and other emergency response personnel. That is to say, that if an emergency occurs near local or state borders, emergency personnel can respond regardless of their home base.

  • Lawmakers tackle range of legislation in House

    With January behind us, the General Assembly is finding the quick pace that defined the legislative session’s opening days is now settling into a more measured routine.

    The first few weeks, of course, were dominated by two main actions: Gov. Steve Beshear’s speeches on the state of the Commonwealth and his budget proposal; and redistricting, which the House and Senate undertake each decade to reflect population changes in their districts and those of the Kentucky Supreme Court and our congressional delegation.

  • Redistricting makes Hornback county’s new state senator

    Hello. My name is Paul Hornback and I am your new state senator.

    It is our constitutional duty every 10 years to realign our voting districts according to population after each census. This act fulfills the requirement of one man, one vote. Because of population shifts, the 20th State Senatorial District now includes Carroll County in addition to part of Boone and Jefferson counties and all of Gallatin, Henry, Shelby and Spencer counties. (The final congressional district lines are still being discussed between the chambers.)

  • Library gathering on anniversary recounted stories from ‘37 flood

    In 1987, the 50th anniversary of the flood, I was in my fifth year as director of the public library. During those first five years I had heard many of our patrons refer to the flood, had seen the plaque in the court house, had learned that many of the old copies of The News-Democrat had been destroyed as water rose into the newspaper offices, and had begun to gather photographs and articles about that very significant period in Carroll County’s history.

  • Library gathering on anniversary recounted stories from ‘37 flood

    In 1987, the 50th anniversary of the flood, I was in my fifth year as director of the public library. During those first five years I had heard many of our patrons refer to the flood, had seen the plaque in the court house, had learned that many of the old copies of The News-Democrat had been destroyed as water rose into the newspaper offices, and had begun to gather photographs and articles about that very significant period in Carroll County’s history.

  • Library gathering on anniversary recounted stories from ‘37 flood

    In 1987, the 50th anniversary of the flood, I was in my fifth year as director of the public library. During those first five years I had heard many of our patrons refer to the flood, had seen the plaque in the court house, had learned that many of the old copies of The News-Democrat had been destroyed as water rose into the newspaper offices, and had begun to gather photographs and articles about that very significant period in Carroll County’s history.