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Today's Opinions

  • Taxpayer unhappy with paving work

    Editor:

    As taxpayers sometimes we wonder where our money is spent. I saw it used Thursday on Harley Drive. They finally paved the street after several years. But it was a problem and no one seemed to want to fix it. The company the city hired to do the work piled all the dirt and gravel in my driveway. I asked the paving company who was going to fix it and they said they were. But after paving the street, they left, leaving the clean up for me.

  • Girl Scouts to hold membership meeting

    Editor:

    The Carroll County Girl Scouts will hold a meeting for any girls wanting to become scouts, 6:30 p.m., Tuesday, Aug. 26, at Westrick Park under the shelter by the tennis courts. For information please contact Crystal Richards, (502) 525-1646 or crystal176kids@gmail.com.

    Crystal Richards

    Carrollton

  • New policy concerns rescue squad officers

    Editor:

    This article is being written as a direct rebuttal to the allegations brought against the rescue squad and its members.

    These allegations are not only untrue but also a direct attack against the squad and its members. If there is proof that there have been recent accidents involving the rescue squad and their privately owned vehicles, while responding to incidents it needs to be brought forth to the Board of Directors of Carroll County Rescue.

  • Kentucky plays key role in the nation’s medical advances

    Several weeks ago, Kentucky received international attention when we learned that an Owensboro facility was the home of an experimental serum given to two Americans who had become infected with the Ebola virus in Africa.

    While more work is necessary to determine the treatment’s effectiveness, it nonetheless speaks well of our state that we can play a leading role in tackling what has been called the world’s worst outbreak of this disease.

    What makes this treatment unique is that it was produced using a plant Kentucky knows well: tobacco.

  • Community support provides for programs

    We have all heard the saying, “It takes a village to raise a child.” I think that applies to raising great children and raising a great community.  This year the library had one of it’s most successful Summer Reading Program, with more than 2,000 people attending events for families and children in the months of June and July. 

  • Frustrations build over the political gridlock in nation

    Frankfort State Journal

    When we look at the political gridlock in our nation’s capital — and to an extent in our own capital — as citizens and taxpayers we’re reminded of the story told by the late Southern comedian Jerry Clower (1926-98). It went something like this:

    While walking in the woods, two men encountered a wildcat on the trail. One of the men began to run and found a tree to climb. The wildcat gave chase and went right on up after him.

  • Transportation proves a key to the economy in Kentucky

    Over the last several weeks, there has been renewed discussion about two of Kentucky’s oldest forms of transportation: rivers and railroads.

    Late last month, the General Assembly’s Budget Review Subcommittee on Transportation dedicated part of its monthly meeting to learn more about the central role Kentucky plays when it comes to barge traffic.

  • DNA advances aid in researching ancestry

    Last month, I attended the Genealogical Research Institute of Pittsburgh, or GRIP, for a weeklong course in using DNA to aid in family history research.

    It was fascinating.

    It turns out that genetic genealogists are the driving force behind breakthroughs in DNA testing and tools to help analyze data, which can answer all sorts of questions that come up when researching a family tree.