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Today's Opinions

  • Make friends with good news sources

    The Advocate-Messenger

    Who do you trust? You probably trust family members and friends you’ve known a long time. And you probably trust them even if you disagree with them on many things.

    You don’t trust strangers you just met, nor should you.

    It’s not surprising, then, that people don’t trust news stories from websites they’ve never heard of before or that they don’t read regularly.

  • Technology has changed the way people interact with government leaders

    There was a time when most people connected with their elected officials over landline phones or by sending a letter through the postal service.

    Oh, how times have changed.

  • Newspaper has covered changes over 150 years

    The Civil War had ended just a couple of years earlier and the nation was still recovering from the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, a native Kentuckian.

    Residents of Carrollton were hungry for news and the chance to keep up with local happenings, as well as those across the nation.

  • Newspaper has covered changes over 150 years

    The Civil War had ended just a couple of years earlier and the nation was still recovering from the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, a native Kentuckian.

    Residents of Carrollton were hungry for news and the chance to keep up with local happenings, as well as those across the nation.

  • Newspaper has covered changes over 150 years

    The Civil War had ended just a couple of years earlier and the nation was still recovering from the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, a native Kentuckian.

    Residents of Carrollton were hungry for news and the chance to keep up with local happenings, as well as those across the nation.

  • Truth and Consequences educates students about results of poor decisions

    At the end of March community partners in Carroll County will hold an event called Truth and Consequences.

    The event is a program that is derived from Kentucky’s Cooperative Extension Service in Clinton County, Ky., and is used across the state in many counties. This year Carroll County’s Exten-sion Office partnered up with County Schools, Youth Services, Lighthouse and others to bring a community and school based event.

  • House majority leaders limited discussion on new charter schools

    Fifteen minutes – that’s how long the new House Majority let opponents to charter schools discuss a last-minute funding bill that will siphon money from our public schools for years to come.

    It was an 11th-hour sneak attack on March 15th, offered in the final moments of the final day for passing legislation. It was certainly not the first assault on the democratic process during the 2017 session, but it’s the one with the most potential for damaging the future of Kentucky’s school children.

  • Session proved very productive on issues

    Early mornings turned to late nights and spirited debate echoed through the House and Senate chambers as we closed in on the final days of the 2017 Legislative Session in Frankfort. A flurry of bills were sent to Governor Matt Bevin’s desk this week, highlighted by measures to empower our Kentucky teachers and create better learning environments for our Kentucky students.