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Today's Opinions

  • EDUCATION PAYS

    About a month ago, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York reaffirmed what has long been assumed: A college degree really is worth the investment.
    Using data dating back to 1973, the Fed determined that those with a bachelor’s degree earn about $64,500 a year, which is nearly $24,000 more than someone who finishes their education at the end of high school.  Over a career, that difference adds up to $1.2 million, or nearly 10 times the cost to earn that four-year diploma.

  • Library’s resources aid local students as school resumes

    At a meeting toward the end of June, I had a discussion about how quickly the summer was going by and that it seemed like it was almost over. The funny part about this discussion is that summer had not actually even started.
    Our definition of the seasons is no longer determined by when they actually start, but by when our idea of them starts. Summer might be the most extreme example of this, but they all seem to follow the pattern ingrained in us by the schedule we followed from age 5 to age 18: the school calendar.

  • Champions ‘thank you’ for help at town hall meetings

    Editor:
    Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County would like to take a moment to thank everyone that came out to the Worthville and Sanders Town Hall meetings in July. We wouldn’t be successful without all of you and your hard work.

  • Community needs more sheriff’s deputies

    Editor:
    The Fiscal Court needs a plan of action to show how another sheriff would benefit the community?
    Just read the newspaper or watch the television news to know of the drug and criminal activity increasing in Carroll County. Go to your local city/commission meetings and hear the frustrations of the citizens trying to deal with these situations.

  • Childhood mortality continues its decline with state’s efforts

    From a historical perspective, one of our country’s greatest success stories over the last century has been the steep decline in childhood mortality.
    Between 1907 and 2007, the number of children who did not make it to their fifth birthday dropped from about 1,400 out of every 100,000 to less than 30, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  For those ages five to 14, the mortality rate went from 307 to 15.

  • Childhood mortality continues its decline with state’s efforts

    From a historical perspective, one of our country’s greatest success stories over the last century has been the steep decline in childhood mortality.
    Between 1907 and 2007, the number of children who did not make it to their fifth birthday dropped from about 1,400 out of every 100,000 to less than 30, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  For those ages five to 14, the mortality rate went from 307 to 15.

  • Conference provides insight into battle with drug epidemic

    As you’re reading this, as your Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County Coordinator, I’m with assistant coordinator Kimberly Fain finishing up our last day of Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America training.
    CADCA hosts an annual mid-year training institute for coalitions all across America and even some from other countries.
    As you all know, Champions Coalition in Carroll County is not the only organization that cares about diminishing drugs in their communities.

  • Conference provides insight into battle with drug epidemic

    As you’re reading this, as your Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County Coordinator, I’m with assistant coordinator Kimberly Fain finishing up our last day of Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America training.
    CADCA hosts an annual mid-year training institute for coalitions all across America and even some from other countries.
    As you all know, Champions Coalition in Carroll County is not the only organization that cares about diminishing drugs in their communities.