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Today's Opinions

  • Summer Reading Program aids in learning for children

    It is hard to believe we are coming toward the end of what we typically consider summer. After 13 or more years of schooling, I think we have all been conditioned to accept June and July as our summer months.

    During my tenure at the library, I have noticed a trend with our Summer Reading Program that I would like for you to help us change.

    We begin Summer Reading Program with a bang. Everyone is fresh off of a great school year and looking to continue learning over the summer.

  • State should show small surplus; Most new laws went in effect July 13

    The halls of the Capitol may be relatively quiet when July arrives, but that doesn’t detract from the month’s importance when it comes to running state government.  It marks the start of another fiscal year and, in even-numbered years, is when most new state laws take effect.

  • Enforce new laws on golf carts before someone gets hurt

    Everywhere I go these days, I see folks riding around in golf carts, UTVs or side-by-sides.

    They’ve become so popular that Carroll County and the city of Carrollton have put ordinances in place requiring setting new safety requirements they must meet. The new laws make good sense with them on our roadways, mixing in with regular traffic.

  • Criminal justice reform necessary in Kentucky

    We’ve reached a critical point in Kentucky – one where our prisons and jails are full, overdose deaths continue to rise and far too many children have parents who are imprisoned.

    We can no longer afford to cling to the outdated idea that prison is the only way to effectively hold people accountable for their crimes. Instead, we need to take a smarter, more measured approach to criminal justice.

  • Criminal justice reform necessary in Kentucky

    We’ve reached a critical point in Kentucky – one where our prisons and jails are full, overdose deaths continue to rise and far too many children have parents who are imprisoned.

    We can no longer afford to cling to the outdated idea that prison is the only way to effectively hold people accountable for their crimes. Instead, we need to take a smarter, more measured approach to criminal justice.

  • States learn from sharing during southern legistaltive conference

    States have often been called laboratories of democracy, and for good reason: That’s where most cutting-edge ideas to improve government are first tested.  The good ones are widely copied while the unworkable ones teach a valuable lesson as well.

  • What diabetes can teach you

    Diabetes is fast becoming a global epidemic in adults and ever increasingly in youth. In fact, the World Health Organization says it now affects 9 percent of the world’s population, making it important to know the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes.

    Both relate to your pancreas’ ability to produce insulin, which is the key in the metabolism of almost all nutrients. Type 1 is linked to a genetic predisposition, while type 2 is associated with lifestyle and CAN BE REVERSED.

  • Fourth of July celebrates America, honors sacrifices of its veterans

    As it has for nearly two-and-a-half centuries, our nation will pause on Monday to celebrate its “birth” day, commemorating a time 240 years ago when the Founding Fathers declared our independence.

    Since July 4, 1776, we have weathered a war for our freedom, a war against ourselves and wars against those who would like nothing more than to see us and our values falter. Although the world has changed in countless ways since Thomas Jefferson penned the Declaration of Independence, our commitment to protect and promote freedom has never wavered.