Today's Opinions

  • UK’s assault on open government

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    President Eli Capilouto’s insistence that the University of Kentucky must sue its student newspaper to protect sexual abuse victims from unwanted public exposure may be sincere but it flunks Reality 101.

    Meanwhile, UK’s flouting of the Kentucky Open Records Act in this and too many instances is damaging the university’s reputation and undermining public trust in Kentucky’s academic flagship.

  • Unique variety of festivals are held in Kentucky every autumn

    If there is one theme binding the numerous festivals that take place across the commonwealth each year, it’s that if we raise it, grow it or use a lot of it, there’s almost certainly a community that celebrates it.

    Most of these festivals take place over a 10-week period that begins in late August and runs through Halloween, and food is often the focal point.  During that time, you can find events dedicated to apples, chicken, country ham, sorghum, bourbon, honey, barbecue and even salt.

  • Thanks for coverage of Arts n’ Barks


    I would like to thank The News Democrat for the full-page coverage of the Arts n’ Barks in the Park. The event was a family fun-filled day with vendors, music and activities for all. It was great to see the community get involved. I appreciate the newspaper picturing all the happenings of the day.

    Sandy Beall


  • Retirement leaves AG office less equipped to deal with open meetings, open records

    Editor’s note: The article referenced in this column, “Kentucky’s Open Records Law: Celebrating the 40th anniversary of Open Government,” is on page 3.

    Amye Bensenhaver likes to talk. There’s no denying that. She’s talks fast, too, like she’s afraid she won’t be able to give you all the information she has before the next question comes. And Amye has a lot of information.

    That is, of course, why I called her.

  • Rand reflects on how Kentuckians were involved in the 9/11 tragedy

    On Sunday morning, our nation will pause to remember and reflect upon the tragedy known primarily by its date: 9/11.

    Those of us old enough to remember that Tuesday in 2001 will never forget where we were and what we were doing when we heard the news.  It had the same impact as such other pivotal moments in history, from the attack on Pearl Harbor and President Kennedy’s assassination to Neil Armstrong’s walking on the moon.

  • Expanded summer reading program successful


  • Labor Day honors the American workforce

    At their core, the major American holidays are bound by a common thread: They remind us of who we are and what we stand for, each and every year.

    While the Fourth of July celebrates our founding and freedom, Memorial Day and Veterans Day call on us never to forget the high price paid for those enduring gifts. Thanksgiving gives us a moment among loved ones to appreciate the many good things in our lives, and on Labor Day, which arrives this weekend, we pay tribute to the hard work that made our nation what it is today.

  • Parent involvement promotes children’s success

    I had the privilege of attending a Title I meeting for our schools on Monday night at Kathryn Winn Primary. I will refer to the experience in the loosest sense of the term as a “meeting” because the only people there was myself and Gerda Wise with the school district. Despite the low number of attendees I found it to be very informative and felt this month’s column would be an excellent vehicle for sharing the information with others.