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Today's Opinions

  • Newspaper has covered changes over 150 years

    The Civil War had ended just a couple of years earlier and the nation was still recovering from the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, a native Kentuckian.

    Residents of Carrollton were hungry for news and the chance to keep up with local happenings, as well as those across the nation.

  • Newspaper has covered changes over 150 years

    The Civil War had ended just a couple of years earlier and the nation was still recovering from the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln, a native Kentuckian.

    Residents of Carrollton were hungry for news and the chance to keep up with local happenings, as well as those across the nation.

  • Truth and Consequences educates students about results of poor decisions

    At the end of March community partners in Carroll County will hold an event called Truth and Consequences.

    The event is a program that is derived from Kentucky’s Cooperative Extension Service in Clinton County, Ky., and is used across the state in many counties. This year Carroll County’s Exten-sion Office partnered up with County Schools, Youth Services, Lighthouse and others to bring a community and school based event.

  • House majority leaders limited discussion on new charter schools

    Fifteen minutes – that’s how long the new House Majority let opponents to charter schools discuss a last-minute funding bill that will siphon money from our public schools for years to come.

    It was an 11th-hour sneak attack on March 15th, offered in the final moments of the final day for passing legislation. It was certainly not the first assault on the democratic process during the 2017 session, but it’s the one with the most potential for damaging the future of Kentucky’s school children.

  • Session proved very productive on issues

    Early mornings turned to late nights and spirited debate echoed through the House and Senate chambers as we closed in on the final days of the 2017 Legislative Session in Frankfort. A flurry of bills were sent to Governor Matt Bevin’s desk this week, highlighted by measures to empower our Kentucky teachers and create better learning environments for our Kentucky students.

  • Bill would shut down the federal Department of Education by 2019

    Should a presidential appointee and an army of bureaucrats in a remote office building thousands of miles away decide what values, morals and ideas to instill in your children? I think not. Of all the harmful things our government in Washington, D.C., does, micromanaging education is perhaps the worst.

  • Casey’s law can be an effective tool to combat the growing drug problem

    It seems as though lately our newspapers are riddled with the wreckage that drug addiction brings to our families and our community. The obituary section is full of depictions of lives ended way too early. The public record section is riddled with stories of people charged with drug possession or drug-related crimes. Our jails are full, children are left dependent, neglected and abused, and the morgues are busier than ever before. No one can deny the impact that drugs are having on our county, state and nation.

  • Advocates say First Amendment can withstand President Trump’s attacks

    By HILLEL ITALIE

    AP National Writer

    Whenever Donald Trump fumes about “fake news” or labels the press “the enemy of the people,” First Amendment scholar David L. Hudson Jr. hears echoes of other presidents — but a breadth and tone that are entirely new.

    Trump may not know it, but it was Thomas Jefferson who once said, “Nothing can now be believed which is seen in a newspaper,” said Hudson, a law professor at Vanderbilt University.