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Features

  • Imagine you are in a room full of people, and everyone is talking with one another, but you hear nothing but silence. That is the struggle deaf people face every day.

    The National Center for Health Statistics estimates that 28 million Americans (about 10 percent of the population) have some degree of hearing loss. About 2 million of these 28 million people are classified as deaf, meaning they can’t hear every day sounds or speech, even with a hearing aid. Only about 10 percent of these 2 million people were born deaf. The other 90 percent became deaf later in life.

  • The Iron Man is one of the toughest competitions an athlete can tackle. At 140.6 miles of swimming, cycling and running, it tests an athlete’s strength, endurance and will. Heather Ray has accepted that challenge – and she’s not letting her heart condition stop her.

  • Not everyone is a baseball fan, but it would be difficult to find someone who does not know at least some of the words to “Take Me Out to the Ballgame.”

    Gene Woodrey, a 95-year-old resident at Fairview Place in Carrollton, Ky., had grown up and lived in southern Ohio on a farm. Entertainment was often what could be found on the radio and Woodrey’s family tuned to 700 WLW to listen to the Cincinnati Reds games. In all of his years, Woolrey had never been taken out to the ballgame.

  • Enter Carroll County High School, and you will be greeted by a friendly smile and a cheerful, “Good morning! How can I help you?”

    Richelle Wheeler is the first impression visitors have of the school, and she takes her job very seriously.

  • Family and enjoying the outdoors are two very important pillars in Patrick Underwood’s life. Born into a large family, he grew up traveling all across the country to visit family members. He enjoyed being outdoors more so than indoors and has continued that tradition on to his children.

  • Nieves Leon knows what it is like to be a stranger in a foreign country, unable to communicate with others. Twenty-five years ago when she and her husband and daughter moved to Carrollton from Spain, she did not know a single word of English.

    Now, after years of additional education and practice, she uses her experience and knowledge to pay it forward.

    Nieves is the daughter of Felix Leon and Nieves Rodriguez and is from Ponferrada in northern Spain. Her father worked as a train conductor, while her mother stayed at home with the six children.

  • “God has a plan for everything, and if you just lay it in his hands, everything works out.”

    Those are the words that Angie Searcy lives her life by and that she shares with her family, her friends and others.

  • Well, my friends, here we are. Right here, once again in the middle of the holiday season. Thanksgiving is barely out of sight and Christmas is fast approaching. It’s hard to imagine that 2015 is almost in the rear-view mirror. But, alas, we must move on and, frankly, a delicious time is quickly approaching.

  • Strong. Powerful. Determined. Relentless.

    Carroll County High School senior running back Cameron Rose is all of these things. Carrying the ball just 120 times during the regular season, he amassed 821 rushing yards. He added 148 receiving yards and scored eight total touchdowns (six rushing, two receiving). He also played on both sides of the ball, leading the Panthers in tackles with 73 (62 solo, 11 assisted).

  • A call that Tanya Supple of Carrollton nearly hung up on Saturday night because she thought it was a telemarketer turned out to be one telling her she had won a home in Norton Commons valued at almost a half-million dollars.

    In a Tuesday interview, Supplee said she bought one ticket during a telethon on WAVE3-TV, after her mother offered several times to go in on one with her. She said this was unusual because her mother isn’t one to gamble or buy tickets on raffles.

  • At just seven years old, LJ Hearn already understands what it means to volunteer and share with those who are less fortunate than him.

  • Sports are an important part of small town life in places like Carroll County. Not only do sports teach student-athletes values like discipline, hard work, responsibility and teamwork, they also can instill community pride.

    One important piece of the game that may sometimes be overlooked is the announcer. Watch a ball game in complete silence, and it’s just not the same. Announcers bring energy and excitement to the environment, and the athletes–and their families–love to heartheir name called out over the loud speaker.

  • For some people, jumping out of an airplane is at the top of their bucket list. For others, it couldn’t be any further from the top.

    But for Bob McBurney, it was something he was trained to do.

    Robert C. “Bob” McBurney of Carrollton served from 1944-1946 in the United States Army as a paratrooper. He was a member of the 13th Airborne Division, 515th Parachute Infantry Regiment in World War II.

  • Hello once again, my friends. Here we are, staring at Halloween and cooler weather is upon us. And frankly, it doesn’t bother me one bit. I love hearty foods and nothing says hearty like cold weather. Oh, and I also make sure to write a chili article at the beginning of every year, just so everyone can get in the mood before cold weather hits. 

  • Like most people who fall down into the rabbit hole known as researching one’s family history, I got carried away building my tree, following every lead and going in 15 different directions at once.

  • It takes a special kind of dog–and person–to become a member of the Kentucky State Police Special Operations K-9 Unit.

    Trooper First Class Ryan Gosser has been with the unit since 2008 and a trooper since 2001. He currently works with two dogs: Grizz, a German Shepherd who is about five years old, and Bear, a black Labrador Retriever who is about six years old. He has had Grizz for between three and four years and Bear for about two years.

  • Being an interpreter is more than just being able to speak multiple languages. It takes accuracy, precision and focus to do the job.

    Magali McCarty is Carroll County’s only certified Spanish interpreter through the Administrative Office of the Courts and the only AOC-certified Portuguese interpreter in the state of Kentucky, earning her certifications in 2004.

  • Carolyn Stout has seen many changes to Carrollton and Carroll County over the years.

    She grew up on Highland Avenue, or sometimes known as High Street, in one of the two matching brick houses just down the street from her current home.

  • Walk inside New Image beauty shop in downtown Carrollton, and you will likely be greeted by the hum of at least one of the six driers, the chatter of mostly women in the worn leather chairs and the infectious laugh of hairdresser Nana Adams.

    If you’re not a regular, you will likely be asked to wait, as Nana and fellow hairdresser Chuck Gordon are virtually booked up with their loyal customers, who Nana refers to as her family. She has worked at New Image since 1986 and has owned the shop since 1990.