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Features

  •  Sometimes, with the right group of people, it doesn’t matter how much time passes from the last time you were together.

    That’s the way it was for me the weekend of June 23-24, when my best friend and I took a road trip to a tiny town in the Catskills of upstate New York to reunite with some of my co-workers from the past.

  •  Sometimes, with the right group of people, it doesn’t matter how much time passes from the last time you were together.

    That’s the way it was for me the weekend of June 23-24, when my best friend and I took a road trip to a tiny town in the Catskills of upstate New York to reunite with some of my co-workers from the past.

  • • Born and raised in Owen County

    • Resides in Owen County with his wife of 26 years, Tracy

    • Has three children and three grandchildren

    • Graduated from Owen County High School and attended night classes at Kentucky State University and Northern Kentucky University

    • Worked in construction for more than 25 years

    • Served as certified home inspector and building inspector in Owen County for eight years before coming to Carrollton

  •  The weather is getting warmer, and Kentuckians are again firing up their grills for tasty burgers and steaks. Gov. Steve Beshear recognizes this American tradition and has proclaimed May 2012 Beef Month in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. 

     “I urge all Kentuckians to support Kentucky’s beef cattle industry and to salute the cattle farmers for their contribution to Kentucky’s agricultural and rural economy during the month of May,” Beshear said.

  •  With a little understanding, Expected Progeny Differences may actually be the best tool producers have to address the genetics of their herds.

    While calculating EPD takes a lot of math, producers do not have to do the math; they just need to understand the answers. The calculation results usually appear in the first pages of a sire summary before the actual EPD tables. They may look a little confusing, but the information is very beneficial. It comes down to the fact that you are buying the DNA of a particular animal.

  •  This is the perfect time to take in the beauty in the state of Kentucky and the good news is that you can get in a lot of good exercise while we are doing it.

    In fact, walking and hiking can help you lose weight, decrease blood pressure and improve bone strength.

  • There’s a new face attending to patients at Carroll County Family Practice.

    Dr. Milagros Rivera began working at the practice, located in Carroll County Memorial Hospital, about two weeks ago after more than 13 years as a physician in the Louisville metropolitan area.

    Rivera, who is fluent in Spanish, has a passion for family practice and hopes to help members of the local Hispanic community.

  • If you told someone you were going to walk 60 miles over three straight days, they may raise their eyebrows. But that is exactly what Carrollton resident Brittany Belcher and thousands of other people across the country did to raise money for breast cancer research.

  • “He’s tougher than a pine knot.”

    That’s John Boots’ assessment of his grandson, Colston, 11, who lives with his family in their Harbor Point home in Carrollton.

    Colston Boots, a sixth-grader at Carroll County Middle School, is a rising star on the dirt-bike racing circuit, competing in – and winning – competitions on tracks throughout Kentuckiana.

  • One of the latest trends to sweep Facebook is groups dedicated to individual cities and counties, showing what makes them unique. They provide a great opportunity to share a funny story or reminisce  about days gone by.
    The News-Democrat created Carroll County’s group on Aug. 4, and as of press time Tuesday, it had 240 members. The following is a sampling of responses by group members.
    Want to join the conversation? Join our Facebook group or e-mail your
    submission to ksherrard@mycarrollnews.com

  • Wednesday, June 22

    Carrollton Rotary Club meets every Wednesday at noon at Butler Park lodge.

    AA Big Book study group meets every Wednesday at 2 p.m. at Carrollton Christian Church, 310 Fifth St.

    Cartmell Elementary School Site Based Decision Making Council meets at 3:30 p.m. an the school.

    Thursday, June 23

  • Our family has been a busy one this week. We spent June 12 hosting an engagement party for our daughter and her fiancé.

    It was only for the family, but the groom’s family is quite large. It was fun for me because now that I no longer cater, I have the time to do more meals and parties for friends and family, which I love to do.

    Since I did not know the likes and dislikes of the group we were entertaining, I tried to include some very simple, but well-liked foods that I have served over the years. 

  • The threat of severe storms Friday night and into Saturday morning didn’t deter the 15 teams participating in this year’s Relay for Life at the Carroll County Fairgrounds.

    County Relay Chairman Scott Niswonger said meteorologists earlier in the week forecast a 60 percent chance of severe thunderstorms, prompting him to call a special meeting with team captains and other Relay official Thursday night to determine options for the annual event, which was held from 7 p.m. Friday to 7 a.m. Saturday.

  • Now that Easter is only a few days away, I have found myself doing a little reminiscing. I remember the way we celebrated Easter when I was a little girl. My maternal grandmother always bought my Easter dress, hat gloves and all. The dresses were always frilly with lots of crinoline underneath. Actually, some of those styles have come back for the younger girls.

  • General Butler State Resort Park, together with Kentucky Chautauqua, presents a living-history drama, “Lucy Bakewell Audubon: A Kentucky Love Story,” at 7 p.m. today, Wednesday, April 20, in the Lodge Lounge.

    Lucy Bakewell Audubon was the wife of John James Audubon, the famed naturalist, artist and author of “Birds of America.” She felt she was “perfectly suited” for him and was incredibly devoted to him. She made enormous sacrifices and suffered public scorn as she supported her husband’s talents.

  • Bill Davis shared this history of Ghent College and Ghent School with The News-Democrat after the structure was destryoed by fire Sunday. Davis researched this for the “Encyclopedia of Northern Kentucky.”

    Ghent College in Carroll County, Ky., was founded in 1867, when local citizens led by James Frank formed a corporation creating a private nonsectarian college for white students at Ghent. A three-story brick college building was built on the western edge of town the following year, at a cost of $31,700.

  • The Carroll-Henry county area recently became the inspiration and blank canvas for a student’s senior thesis photography project.

    Lauren DiFulvio, a senior at College of Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati, Ohio, photographed a series of portraits and environmental shots in Port Royal, English, Turners Station and Carrollton for her thesis project.

  • Members of Carroll County Animal Support donated 14 books to Kathryn Winn Primary School’s library Monday, April 11, as part of the local celebration of Kentucky Week for the Animals. The books teach about how to care for pets and the importance of adopting shelter dogs and cats.

    Principal Gerda Wise received books from CCAS members Robin Caldwell, left, Executive Director Tammie Crawford, center, and Victoria Meister.

  • Lindsey Wilson College is coming to Jefferson Community and Technical College-Carrollton Campus.
    LWC is offering an accelerated bachelor’s degree in human services and counseling and a master’s degree in mental health counseling and human development at the Carrollton campus.

    Interested in more information about these programs? Join us for an information session on Tuesday, June 28. Drop by between 5-7 p.m. to find out more.