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Features

  • The Easter Bunny made the rounds Saturday in Trimble County, attending Easter Egg Hunts held at Mount Hermon Church on Kings Ridge Road and at Trimble County Park, co-hosted by the Milton Volunteer Fire Department and Emergency Squad and Milton Baptist Church.

    Winners of The Trimble Banner’s 2009 Easter Coloring Contest were chosen this week.

      .

  • The News-Democrat

    Students who went to the English School for any length of time are invited to a reunion-planning meeting to try to reconstruct the timeline and friendships of a bygone era.

    Sue Leite, a former student there from 1950 until 1958, is spearheading the reunion and has planned an organizational meeting for 1 p.m.  Friday, April 17, at the English Christian Church at 3477 State Hwy. 389 in English.

  • The News-Democrat

    Two distant cousins find they have similar plans for improving their career prospects through furthering their educations.

     In a down economy, they agree that getting additional education is one of the best ways to assure someone of keeping a job or getting a better job.

  • Special to The News-Democrat

    Local Students from surrounding counties visited 16 different establishments Monday not for a regular field trip but to place themselves in the employee’s shoes for a day.

    Students from Gallatin, Trimble, Owen, and Carroll counties started their school day off like any regular day; but instead of attending class they attended Job Shadowing Day at CCATC (Carroll County Area Technology Center). Shadowing gives students the chance to experience what it would be like if they chose that path for a career.

  • After 14 years of day and night seizures, Hannah Marsh has been seizure-free for five months.  

    Hannah, an 18-year-old senior at Carroll County High School, has suffered from seizures since she was 4. Doctors could find no reason for the seizures, which occur mainly at night. She has had as many as 40 in one night.

    This changed five months ago when she underwent brain surgery at Vanderbilt University Hospital in Nashville, Tenn. The surgery removed part of Hannah’s brain where the seizures originated; that portion of her brain had begun to turn black.

  • Stepping down as vice president of the Carroll County Arts Commission, Jim Fothergill encouraged all arts commission members to attend the next meeting, set for 6:30 p.m. Thursday, March 19, in the community room at the Carroll County Public Library.

    Members will be electing a new president and vice president. Current president Mark Davis also is stepping down from his position.

    Fothergill spoke during the March 5 meeting, during which he’d hoped the election could be held. However, only a handful of members attended that meeting.

  • An invasion of sorts is coming to the Family Worship Center, and young people from sixth-grade up to age 25 are invited to attend.

    The Invasion Tour, a division of Go-Ministries, will bring its high-energy traveling show to the church, located on State Hwy. 227, in Carrollton, on Friday and Saturday, March 13-14. The show begins each evening at 7 p.m., with a pre-service prayer at 6:15 p.m.

    The Invasion Tour includes a Christian-rock band, skits and a short dramatic play.

  • Two local artists from different generations – but with similar styles – are showing their works at the Carroll County Public Library this month.

    Mike Anderson and Will Crase each have a showing that is modern, employs lots of color and represents things they say are important in their own lives.

    Anderson, an employee at North American Stainless, is a 1988 graduate of Eastern Kentucky University, where he earned  a bachelor’s degree in fine arts and graphic design.

  • Many area residents took advantage of a chance Saturday to have experts appraise their treasures during Personal Treasures Day at Butler-Turpin State Historic House.

    Similar to the PBS show, “Antiques Roadshow,” Historic House site manager Evelyn Welch invited Ron Langdon and Jack Bailey, also historic site managers with Kentucky Department of Parks, and Brad Miller of Cornerstone Society of Madison, Ind., a preservation to be appraisers.

  • From the battles of Bryan Station and Blue Licks during the Revolutionary War to keeping the Underground Railroad on track prior to the Civil War, Kentucky has lots of heroes to celebrate.

    Students at Cartmell Elementary School last week learned about these points in the state’s and the country’s history through the arts, with the help from artist-in-residence Bob Ford.

    Last time Ford was in town, several years ago, he worked with the students several times throughout the year to help them write and produce a play about local history.

  • It was standing room only during the Friday and Saturday performances of “Grease” this past weekend in the Sam Simpson Auditorium at Carroll County Middle School.

    In fact, Saturday’s tickets were sold out and hopeful theater-goers were asked to return for an extra showing Sunday afternoon.

    And it seems the wait was worth it. Audiences were treated to an impressive production with fabulous sets, excellent costumes and outstanding singing and dancing by the actors, all middle- and high-school students.

  • The Pink Ladies and T-Birds of Rydell High will be be-bopping onstage in a musical production of “Grease” this weekend at Carroll County Middle School.

    Performances are set for 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Feb. 6-7, in the Sam Simpson Auditorium at CCMS. Tickts are $5, and are only being sold at the door.

  • As businesses deal with the realities of a national recession, Carroll County Chamber of Commerce members got some hands-on advice on how to make their way through the economic downtown.

    Speaking Tuesday, Jan. 13, to the chamber membership meeting at General Butler State Resort Park, David Oetken of Louisville offered five steps to survive the recession.

    As director of Greater Louisville Inc., that city’s Chamber of Commerce,  Oetken said his job is to assist businesses with funding and running their operations.

  • The photographic art of lifelong resident Jim Fothergill is next to be on display in the community room at the Carroll County Public Library for February.

    The show opens with an artist’s reception from 6:30-8 p.m. Monday, Feb. 9, and also will feature sketches by Carroll County High School student Lauren Wright in the alcove.

  • To say Jim Mitchell is one in a million was definitely an understatement last week.

    Mitchell, a 12-year veteran of the Kentucky State Police, was among more than two million people who crowded into Washington, D.C. on Jan. 20, with most there to witness the inauguration festivities as Barack Obama became the nation’s 44th president.

  • The peace and serenity of an idyllic setting in Carroll County, with a beautiful lake, a large forest and a place for a bonfire, lately has been disturbed by the pounding of drums, wailing of electric guitars and “screamo” singing.

    It is rehearsal time for the local heavy-metal band, Hiding It All, and band members Travis Rice (bass guitar), Doug Dempsey (lead guitar), Nathan Toeves (drums), Ryan Jackson (lead screamer/singer) and Jordan Edmonson (rhythm guitar) are making the walls of one Mound Hill Road home shake, rattle and roll.

  • By LORRIE KINKADE

    The Trimble Banner

    While her Trimble County Lady Raider teammates were fighting for a win on the court Jan. 10, Hannah Ball was parading across a stage in the Galt House’s Grand Ballroom as a contestant in the Miss Kentucky County Fair pageant.

    Although Ball, the 2008 Miss Trimble County Fair, did not place at the state competition, the experience was one she said she would never forget. And hopes to have again.

  • A former executive and future middle school teacher has written and published what she hopes to be the first of many books of poetry – and maybe a novel or two.

  • You might say Jim Ebert’s life is full of highs and lows.

    Ebert, director of Carroll County’s Camp Kysoc, took former county resident Skylar Cannon hiking to the bottom of the Grand Canyon on Nov. 28.

    Two weeks later, on Dec. 11, Ebert helped fulfill another disabled hiker’s dream – climbing to the highest summit of Mount Kilimanjaro in Africa.

  • By LORRIE KINKADE

    The Trimble Banner

    To hear Brinley Craig’s infectious giggle, anyone unfamiliar with the little boy would find it hard to believe the medical struggles he has endured over the last two months.

    In November, Trampus and Amanda Craig’s then 10-month-old son was diagnosed with mucopolysaccharidoses, also known as Type 1 MPS or Hurler Syndrome.