• Buses are loaded up, lunchboxes are packed up and students have returned to school in Carroll County. At Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County, we are geared up and excited for a fun-filled year with education and prevention at our forefront as always.

  • Well, we made it through. Our first yearlong series of features, “Carroll County At Work,” came to a close last week. Twenty-six feature stories–from auctioneer to zoo interpreter–and everything in between! We wrote about a bus driver, a farmer, a librarian and a veterinarian, just to name a few.

    Even though I wrote most of the stories and read all of them, I still can’t rattle off the names of every job and person without sneaking a peak at my sheet. Can you?

  • An effort to help potentially tens of thousands of Kentuckians truly put their past behind them cleared a key legislative milestone on Friday when the Kentucky House voted to broaden eligibility for criminal expungement.

    Similar measures have passed the chamber numerous times, but there is hope that this year’s legislation will be successful, given the increased bipartisan support it has received.

  • No question is a stupid question, except for the one not asked. You asked, I’m answering. I’d like to take this opportunity to clear up a few things about Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County. Since years 6-10 of the Federal DFC grant were not awarded:

    1.) Champions still exists and we are stronger than ever as a coalition. We have to prove our sustainability if we ever choose to reapply for the grant.

  • The Kentucky Standard

    Your bra is not giving you breast cancer.

    Your deodorant is not giving you breast cancer.

    Coffee is not giving you breast cancer.

    Mammograms are not giving you breast cancer.

    In a large percentage of cases, your genes aren’t even giving you breast cancer.

  • From a historical perspective, one of our country’s greatest success stories over the last century has been the steep decline in childhood mortality.
    Between 1907 and 2007, the number of children who did not make it to their fifth birthday dropped from about 1,400 out of every 100,000 to less than 30, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  For those ages five to 14, the mortality rate went from 307 to 15.

  • As you’re reading this, as your Champions for a Drug Free Carroll County Coordinator, I’m with assistant coordinator Kimberly Fain finishing up our last day of Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America training.
    CADCA hosts an annual mid-year training institute for coalitions all across America and even some from other countries.
    As you all know, Champions Coalition in Carroll County is not the only organization that cares about diminishing drugs in their communities.

  • Reprinted from The State Journal, Frankfort, through the Kentucky Press News Service.


    What could we do with $100 million?

    And by “we,” we the editorial board mean we the people of Kentucky.

    We could repair a lot of roads, and anyone who has driven across the commonwealth knows how badly we need to do that. In fact, drive anywhere in the country and you will see just as many roads under construction.

  • With memories of the long winter starting to fade and the Memorial Day weekend now behind us, the time has come to begin planning for summer.

    There certainly is no shortage of activities nearby or across the state, and their popularity can be seen in the bottom line.  According to an annual study released earlier this month, Kentucky’s tourism and travel industry was responsible for $12.5 billion in direct and indirect spending in 2013, which was a 2.6 percent increase over 2012.  Overall, these businesses employ nearly 176,000 people.

  • Editor:

    My wife Robin and I enjoyed a stroll through downtown Carrollton on Saturday evening of Memorial Day Weekend. The journey reminded us of some of the things we love about Carrollton.

  • Editor:

    I don’t know whether it is a good news or bad news. I was planning to return to Kentucky in June after my one year sabbatical leave. I had purchased the air ticket. Finally I had to submit my will to the will of God.

    I was appointed the Coordinator General of 124 Carmelite (CMI) priests in the U.S. and Canada and pastor of St. Anthony parish, Brooklyn, N.Y. I cancelled my air ticket.

    I had purchased earlier and purchased a new ticket to New York on May 29. I will arrive in New York on May 30.

  • Editor:

    Spring has finally arrived. It must be time for the annual yard sale at the NorthKey Workshop at 416 Fourth St. in Carrollton.

    We promise to have a variety of items for sale. Our guys are looking forward to a great turn out. They enjoy meeting new customers and seeing old friends.

    The yard sale will be held Monday, June 2 and run through Friday, June 6 from 9 a.m. until 2 p.m. each day.

    We look forward to another great year.

    Dee Ellis

    NorthKey Community Care

  • “The best gift my family enjoyed this Christmas was the time we were able to share with my grandmother. She is truly our gift and our blessing.”

    Nicki Beckham

    Ghent, Ky.


    “The greatest gift I received was seeing the excitement on my daughter’s face as she played with all of her new toys, also having the day off and spending time with the ones I love most was pretty great also!!”

    Jenna Rose Bartley

    Carrollton, Ky.


  • From The Sentinel-News

    We understand that expansion of the Medicaid plan as part of the Affordable Care Act is seen as a political football, a topic to be kicked back and forth across a field of ideology with not a whole lot of regard for the players involved.

    We also admit that we don’t have the sufficient grasp of either the process or economics to reinforce the decision last week by Gov. Steve Beshear to expand the rolls and open up the possibility that perhaps 300,000 more Kentuckians can have access to health insurance.

  • Guillermo Aguazul

    “To have a 4.0 grade point average my entire
    freshman year.”


    Cody Boles

    “To graduate college and go to physical therapy school.”


    Shelby Crawford

    “To get into Morehead State and get my degree in childcare.”


    Lynn Eaglin

    “To not sweat the small stuff.”


    Anastasia England

    “To graduate and start cosmetology school in August.”

  • Editor:

  • Editor:

    The staff and clients of the Carrollton Adult Day Training at NorthKey would like to thank Rita Power and her staff at River Valley Financial Bank for their generosity toward the ADT at Christmas. On Thursday, Dec. 20, the clients were treated to a pizza party and if that were not enough, the bank also provided a gift bag to each of the clients containing clothes, socks and candy.

    The ADT clients were very surprised and so appreciative that they were given such an unexpected gift. This is truly community service at its finest.

  • In election years, politicians often talk about children as our future.

    If that’s true — and who could argue? — two stories last week provided a Dickensian picture of Kentucky a decade hence:

    Only one in four children is ready for kindergarten, the Kentucky Board of Education reported.

  • Fans of “The Andy Griffith Show” often point to the episode “Citizens Arrest” as a favorite. Residents may not be making a citizen’s arrest with a new Kentucky State Police initiative, but they can help curb crime.

    A new text-tip line will allow the public to send confidential tips via cellphones.

    Here’s how it works: A cellphone user with the ability to text can dial 67283, then type KSPTIP in the message field, then leave a space before entering information about a crime or a suspect.