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Opinion

  • Editor:

    As I sat on a bleacher Oct. 11 at the Carroll County Fairgrounds around the demolition derby ring, I gazed out at the humongous crowd attending the 2008 Fall Brawl.

    I’ve attended several of these events in the past, but on Saturday we had enthusiasts from Southern Kentucky, Northern Ohio, Indiana and other surrounding states and surrounding counties. The comments made by these visitors were very complimentary to our promoters, the Fair Board, the county and the participants of the derby.

  • Editor:

    I would like to thank all of the vendors who participate in the Carroll County Farmers’ Market each week.

    I am a Carrollton native, but do not currently live in the area. However, when I am visiting family, I thoroughly enjoy going to the market to buy fresh vegetables from local vendors. The produce is of lower cost and higher quality than that which is found in the grocery stores, and I really admire the hard work each vendor has put into his or her specialties.  

  • I have just been on the most exciting adventure of my life. I went to the Grand Canyon. The goal was to get someone who was unable to walk to the bottom of the canyon.

    My daughter fit that description, and that’s how I came to be included.

    I had been told about the TrailRider before the trip, designed for a handicapped person to be able to ride down a trail that was otherwise inaccessible.

  • Editor:

    Why is it, when the electric was out long enough to ruin food in everyone’s refrigerator, that only welfare recipients get their food replaced?

    What about the families who live week to week that have children to feed? What about the senior citizens who buy their groceries once a month? The food is spoiled, and now they have no way to replace it until next month.

    I know of one welfare mother that gets $800 a month in food stamps, yes I said $800 a month, and is getting another $800 to replace the food she lost.

  • Editor:

    I want to thank Kenneth Kemble, Jacob Kemble, Tonya Edens, Mabel Parrish and Wesley Richmond for donating their time helping me at the Seventh Annual Repair Affair.

    Without their help it would have been impossible to feed the 130-plus volunteers who spent Saturday building and repairing homes for the elderly and disabled in Trimble County.

    It was another great year for us.

    Hilda Parrish

    Bedford, Ky.

  • Editor:

    A big thank you to LG&E and their employees for the beautiful job they did last week. God bless all. My granddaughter, Angie Gosman, is one of the LG&E staff.

  • Editor:

    Carroll County Youth Services would like to say “thank you” to everyone who volunteered to make Safe Night possible and successful.

    There were 150 Carroll County Middle School students who participated in a variety of activities to promote a safe and drug-free evening.

  • Editor:

    I would like to take this opportunity to say thank you to all the area businesses and volunteers that made the Trimble County Youth Explosion a success. To all those that donated money, food, prizes and time, I thank you.

    A special thanks goes to Rita Davis for her help and hard work and for putting up with me. To the Name Sake Band for playing for us, thank you; you were awesome!

    To the people of the community who came and enriched their lives through this program, I thank you.

    God Bless you.

  • Editor:

     

    I want to express my deep appreciation to all who helped with the cleanup of the debris left by the [Sept. 14] storm.

    The City of Carrollton has never had such a windstorm before. Trees and limbs were everywhere: in the streets, in yards, on homes and on other buildings. The most amazing thing to me was that as bad as the storm was, all the streets in Carrollton were open (except the corner of Seventh and Sycamore) by six o’clock Sunday evening. People seemed to appear from everywhere with chainsaws to help clear the streets.  

  • Editor:

    Recently, the Carrollton Police Department and Carroll County Detention Center have been conducting our fund-raisers in an effort to raise money for our annual Shop With A Cop Program.

    This upcoming Christmas will be our eighth straight year for holding the event. Over the past seven years. we have assisted 432 children in the community and have spent $85,605 to ensure that they have an enjoyable Christmas.

  • If you were looking for a quality new or used car last week, I was just the person to call.

    Or at least that is what prospective buyers must have thought, as my cell phone number appeared in 23 Louisville newspaper used car classified ads for three consecutive days.

    And by the end of those three days, the sales manager at a local car dealership almost went into the business of selling goats.

    Monday morning, the first call came shortly after 7 a.m. A polite young woman inquired about the Ford Mustang I had advertised for sale. I assumed it was a wrong number.

  • Editor:

    I would like to compliment Chief Ronnie McCane, George Griffith and the entire Trimble County disaster management team.

    During the recent wind storm, they provided traffic control due to power outages to the traffic signals, risking personal injury when they needed to be at home taking care of their own properties.

    Trimble County should be proud of this fine group of men and women.

    Terry W. Olivigni

    Bedford, Ky.

  • To the editor,

  • To the editor,

    On Wednesday, August 27, 2008, Director of National Drug Control Policy John Walters announced the new grant recipients for Drug-Free Communities Mentoring Support Program. Our neighbor, the Henry Co. CARE Team, was one of only 14 coalitions from across the country to receive the grant award. So how does Trimble County benefit? With this grant, the CARE Team will work with community leaders to revitalize and strengthen the Trimble Co. Drug-Free Task Force as they strive to make an impact on the reduction of substance use and abuse in Trimble County.

  • They claim to be live, local and late breaking. They say they are reporting the news that affects you. But as far as I could tell last Sunday, Jefferson County television news programs consider local to mean only Louisville and parts of Bullitt and Oldham counties in Kentucky.

    It appears that if you live in Trimble County, you are not the “you” they were talking about in all those news promos.

  • Editor:

    On Sept. 18, the Carroll County Chamber of Commerce and the Carroll County Community Development Corporation partnered in hosting the first Business Celebration Day on Courthouse Square in Carrollton.

    The event was free to the public and showcased 51Chamber members. Mini-business seminars were held from 4-6:30 p.m. Food bought with donations from  Arkema and the City of Carrollton was handed out for free to more than 400 people who attended.

  • Without a doubt, I think it’s safe to say that “neighborliness” is alive and well in Carroll County.

    After Hurricane Ike blew through the area on Sunday, Sept. 14 – actually, before Ike was even finished with us – people were out and about, moving trees out of roadways and checking in on their neighbors to make sure everything was OK.

  • Editor:

    The Housing Authority of Carrollton recently hosted it’s ninth annual Neighborhood Watch Picnic. It was an evening of good food, wholesome fun and fellowship among neighbors. The steady growth in attendance each year shows that Neighborhood Watch really is a program without bounds.

  • To the editor,

    Thank you to everyone in the community who gave time, energy and resources to help clean up the aftermath of last Sunday’s wind storm.

    From the time the storm began in the early afternoon until well into the night and the following morning, county residents were there, clearing trees and debris from roadways and participating in impromptu traffic control while the removal took place. Throughout the day, it was common to see the residents of our county exiting vehicles to saw a path through fallen limbs, making travel safer for everyone.

  • Editor:

    After the winds subsided on that Sunday [Sept. 14], Linda Davis, a neighbor down the street, was making her way through limbs, brush and downed trees, knocking on her neighbors’ doors to see if they were all right.

    This is a true example of a community. By dividing the word community, we have “commun” – living in an area together, and “unity” – working together.