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Opinion

  • To the editor,

    Thank you to everyone in the community who gave time, energy and resources to help clean up the aftermath of last Sunday’s wind storm.

    From the time the storm began in the early afternoon until well into the night and the following morning, county residents were there, clearing trees and debris from roadways and participating in impromptu traffic control while the removal took place. Throughout the day, it was common to see the residents of our county exiting vehicles to saw a path through fallen limbs, making travel safer for everyone.

  • Editor:

    After the winds subsided on that Sunday [Sept. 14], Linda Davis, a neighbor down the street, was making her way through limbs, brush and downed trees, knocking on her neighbors’ doors to see if they were all right.

    This is a true example of a community. By dividing the word community, we have “commun” – living in an area together, and “unity” – working together.

  • To the editor,

    We would like to publicly thank Kirby Melvin for his assistance removing fallen trees on our street during this last windstorm.

    This is the second time that the weather has caused trees to fall on our street and Kirby’s response was quick. We realize that during these times a lot of people call on Kirby for help, and he tries very hard to assist everyone. Thanks again to Kirby and his family for meeting the needs of the people.

    Doyle and Faye Miller

  • Editor:

    There is a family in Ghent, Ky. that needs our help. The storm did a great deal of damage to their home. Wayne Lewellyn, his wife and two children need our help.

    I’m having a yard sale Oct. 1-3, starting at 8 a.m. each day. If any one could donate something for this, the drop off is behind Ghent Baptist Church. This is also where I will have the yard sale.

  • She downed the whiskey quickly, slammed the shot glass to the table and raised a rebel yell.

    Okay, not really, but that was what my friend teased she might do when we recently attended our first bourbon-scotch debate in honor of National Bourbon Heritage Month, which was created by the U.S. Senate in 2007.

  • To the editor,

    We want to take this time to say thank you to Marilyn and Randy Webb for all the wonderful care and thoughtfulness shown to residents at Fairground Place Apartments during the aftermath of Hurricane Ike.

    Ms. Marilyn has cooked all of our meals outside on a grill and Mr. Randy has brought hot coffee to us.

    We have elderly residents living here that are on walkers and in wheelchairs and the Webb’s have gone far and beyond their calling to see that everyone here is safe and well taken care of.

  • By SHARON GRAVES

    The News-Democrat

    A few weeks ago, I sat in the cold, darkened training room in Carrollton’s City Hall, watching city and county employees train on the Firearms Training Simulator program. The digital program – known as FATS – projects onto a large screen, life-like situations in which trainees must determine how to subdue a suspect.

    I didn’t think that I could measure up to their training in such situations – even with “virtual” suspects.

  • Editor:

    Milton Elementary School will host its annual fish fry Oct. 18. We’d like to invite everyone to visit us on this special day.

    This year will be the final fish fry at the current Milton Elementary School before our greatly anticipated mid-year move to the new facility. We are excited and nostalgic about the ‘good ole days’! We want to make this year’s fall festival a true “walk down memory lane”.

  • OK. I had my say a couple weeks ago about Carrollton City Council and it’s inability to decide if code enforcement officer John Welch is not doing his job, or has too big a job for one person to handle.

    Any argument regarding the state of the city of Carrollton, in terms of nuisance properties, comes back to this question, it seems.

  • Editor:

    I would like to address this letter to merchants, fellow business people and other individuals, as well.

    The 19th Annual Bedford Bash was a hit. We raised more than $500 for the needy kids' Christmas party through the sale of T-shirts. We gave away several prizes and had a great time. I have heard several positive comments on the band Young Country and on the 2nd Annual [Trimble County Raider] Car Show.  

    Congratulations to the Bedford Post Office for winning the window decorating contest.

  • Editor:

    I am writing to express my concern for teen-agers who have headed back to school this fall and may be exposed to the dangers of underage use of alcohol.  

    As a Kentucky state trooper, I see first-hand the destruction that underage drinking brings on our youth. One of the hardest tasks for any law enforcement officer is to notify a parent whose teen-aged son or daughter has been killed  in an alcohol-related incident.

    In 2007, Kentucky law enforcement arrested 3,108 people ages 16-19 for driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs.

  • Editor:

    I have a lot of parents, families and friends to thank for everything they have done for Trimble County High School football and me. I worked on Midnight Madness for five weeks. I am very pleased to say it turned out to be a great success. I have so many people to thank, and I do not know where to begin.

    That is why I am writing. I am not a great speaker or writer. I don’t think there is a paper big enough to express my gratitude to everyone. I have never been so proud of people in Trimble County and so disappointed in others.

  • Editor:

    It has been 20 years since the Carroll County High School Class of 1988 graduated, and we are having a reunion on Saturday, Oct. 25, at the Conference Center at General Butler State Resort Park.

    We are hoping to get in touch with all of our classmates. Anyone who has not received an invitation, or those who would like more information, can call Marla Bickers at (502) 732-6308, Gwen Abbott at (502) 525-0797, Wayne Adams at 732-0183 or Robin Huesman at 732-6405.

    We have to know who will be attending no later than Sept. 24.

  • Editor:

    After reading Mr. Dapron’s article in the last issue of The News-Democrat, I felt like I had to submit an article. Congratulations Mr. Dapron for speaking your mind! Myself, among many others, agree with you whole heartedly.

    We need more people in this county who are not afraid to speak up.

  • Editor:

    Can someone please tell me what to do about the drinking and driving in Carroll County? It’s gotten way out of control.

    Do I turn in my spouse of 20 years? My 18-year-old daughter? My best friend? My boss at work? And if we do turn in the ones we love, then who is going to turn in the people who leave the bar? Or the people who leave the liquor store? Or the ones who leave the party?

  • To me, it’s obvious, based on statements made at Monday’s Carrollton City Council meeting, that there are many residents who don’t feel that our elected officials are doing enough to clean up this city of about 4,000.

    Several folks came before council and said they feel frustrated that their complaints seem to go unheard.

    I understand what they are saying; it seems that this same argument has been circulating through town for the entire six-and-a-half-plus years I’ve been editor here.

  • Editor:

    Good-old-boy politics is alive and well in the Carroll County Democrat Executive Committee.  On Aug. 8, there were eight people who applied to be the Democrat candidate for constable in District 3.

    Of the eight candidates, two expressed having some degree of law enforcement training; a third had served a year as a police officer in northern Kentucky and spent several years as a military police officer with training in investigative police work.     

  • Editor:

    This story is about animal rights, and if you’re thinking why I wrote this story it’s because I hate seeing animals being abused like they are.

    Have you ever seen an animal get abused like on TV?  It’s just the same in the real world also. Animals can’t talk, so they can’t tell you what they want.

    And they can’t tell you if it hurts or if they don’t like something. So that’s why people abuse them like that.

  • To the editor,

    Every year the Governor’s Scholars Program is open to any school in Kentucky. For the past two years, Trimble County High School has had five students each year participate in the program. Each year the students applying have to fill out a lengthy application including extra-curricular activities, ACT score, and an essay. This year the program had budget cuts, making the program harder to get accepted in to.

  • To the editor,

    What ever happened to enjoying a small town parade and letting the kids have fun outside while you catch up with friends? In a time when everything seems so hectic, kids are glued to the computer and the price of gas is limiting our ability to have fun, it’s time to take a step back and enjoy ourselves and this great community.

    We have the perfect opportunity for that. The Trimble County High School Raider football team is hosting their annual Midnight Madness Saturday, August 23.