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Regional

  • Kentucky high school shooting leaves 2 people dead, 17 injured

    By THOMAS NOVELLY

    Courier-Journal

    When Heather Ligon arrived at her two sons’ safe place near Marshall County High School on Tuesday, her youngest son, just 14, was crawling to her on hands and knees in a panic.

    Ligon’s sons Bryan, 14, and James Dylan, 18, were inside the school when a 15-year-old student opened fire on Tuesday, killing two students and wounding 12 others. Five other teens were hurt while fleeing, police said.

  • What we know now: Marshall County High School shooting

    By THOMAS NOVELLY

    Courier-Journal

    Benton, Ky., was shaken to its core Tuesday when a 15-year-old sophomore went on a shooting rampage at Marshall County High School, killing two students and injuring more than a dozen.

    Here’s what we know now.

    Rising numbers

    While initial reports from Gov. Matt Bevin, witnesses, and Kentucky State Police were spotty, the final numbers of those injured rose overnight.

  • KU unveils electric vehicle charging station at Midway

    Located in horse and bourbon country between Lexington and Louisville, not far from the capital and less than a mile off of Interstate 64, Midway, Kentucky is a passing point for travelers on their way to any number of destinations.

    The town is now bridging the gap in a new way – partnering with Kentucky Utilities to install a new charging station for electric vehicle drivers looking to power up.

  • Kentucky Fish and Wildlife proposes new hunting regulations

    FRANKFORT, Ky. — The Kentucky Fish and Wildlife Commission proposed several new deer, elk and small game hunting regulations at its quarterly meeting Dec 8.

    The commission recommends all hunting, fishing and boating regulations for approval by the General Assembly and approves all expenditures by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources. Legislators must approve regulation recommendations before they become law.

  • Beshear warns of ‘Mystery Shopper’ seasonal employment scam 

    Kentuckians looking to make extra money in time for the Christmas season need to watch out for seasonal employment scams, according to Attorney General Andy Beshear.

    Beshear said his office issued a scam alert today after receiving multiple reports from Kentuckians who said they responded to a seasonal mystery shopper job advertisement that turned out to be a scam. A resident in Scott County reported losing $2,000 to the scam this week.

  • Drawdown underway at Beaver Lake in Anderson

    The Fisheries Division of the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is lowering Beaver Lake in Anderson County as part of an intensive project to improve fish populations through habitat work.

    “We will draw Beaver Lake down 8 feet for a large scale fish habitat project, similar to what we did last year on Elmer Davis Lake in Owen County,” said David Baker, Central Fisheries District biologist for Kentucky Fish and Wildlife.

  • Boycott of Ky. products could send state from ‘dirty’ to green, says climate expert

    By JAMES BRUGGERS

    Courier-Journal

    A scientist in Canada is pointing out that Kentucky is among the biggest global warming piggies on the planet.

    And he’s making the point that something very free market — consumer choice, perhaps even a boycott — could change that.

  • Price tag for Kentucky’s ailing pensions could hit $5.4 billion over next two years

    By JOHN CHEVES

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    Kentucky’s General Assembly will need to find an estimated $5.4 billion to fund the pension systems for state workers and school teachers in the next two-year state budget, officials told the Public Pension Oversight Board on Monday.

  • Charters of Freedom monument dedication Sept. 19

    A monument to honor the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights will be dedicated during a ceremony on the Hanover College campus, Tuesday, Sept. 19. The event will begin at 4 p.m. in front of the Lynn Center for Fine Arts.

  • ‘Fake news’ more than a media problem

    Bowling Green Daily News

    The term “fake news” actually refers to a very real phenomenon: the proliferation, particularly online, of questionably or inadequately sourced – and, in some cases, outright fabricated – reporting. Such content is intentionally designed to mislead, often imitating the look of legitimate news operations in order to deceive consumers.