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Today's Opinions

  • Democrats: Exercise your right to vote, as not all parties have the chance

    Democratic Party voters of Carroll County have an important duty this Tuesday as they go to the polls for the county’s primary election.

    Dozens of Democrats are vying for their party’s nomination to face their Republican challengers this fall for judge-executive, magistrate, sheriff, jailer and constable. The circuit court clerk race will likely be decided with the primary as there is no one registered to run as a Republican in that race and candidates must pass a test before being eligble to run.

  • Stylin’ in the 1890s–Sarah Eva Howe comments on fashion in Carrollton

    Spring was a long time coming this year, but we can finally go outside wearing lighter, more colorful clothes.

    Sarah Eva Howe, a child in Carrollton in the 1890s, collected drawings of the clothing styles favored by the women in the 1890s. Her interest in fashion came naturally. Her father and uncles owned Howe Brothers, the premier clothing store in town. They traveled to New York and other markets to select styles for the fashion-conscious citizens of Carrollton.

  • Stylin’ in the 1890s–Sarah Eva Howe comments on fashion in Carrollton

    Spring was a long time coming this year, but we can finally go outside wearing lighter, more colorful clothes.

    Sarah Eva Howe, a child in Carrollton in the 1890s, collected drawings of the clothing styles favored by the women in the 1890s. Her interest in fashion came naturally. Her father and uncles owned Howe Brothers, the premier clothing store in town. They traveled to New York and other markets to select styles for the fashion-conscious citizens of Carrollton.

  • Stylin’ in the 1890s–Sarah Eva Howe comments on fashion in Carrollton

    Spring was a long time coming this year, but we can finally go outside wearing lighter, more colorful clothes.

    Sarah Eva Howe, a child in Carrollton in the 1890s, collected drawings of the clothing styles favored by the women in the 1890s. Her interest in fashion came naturally. Her father and uncles owned Howe Brothers, the premier clothing store in town. They traveled to New York and other markets to select styles for the fashion-conscious citizens of Carrollton.

  • Stylin’ in the 1890s–Sarah Eva Howe comments on fashion in Carrollton

    Spring was a long time coming this year, but we can finally go outside wearing lighter, more colorful clothes.

    Sarah Eva Howe, a child in Carrollton in the 1890s, collected drawings of the clothing styles favored by the women in the 1890s. Her interest in fashion came naturally. Her father and uncles owned Howe Brothers, the premier clothing store in town. They traveled to New York and other markets to select styles for the fashion-conscious citizens of Carrollton.

  • What you need to know before Primary Election Day

    Every election year, it is my duty as your County Attorney to advise the County Clerk and the County Board of Elections as to any legal issues that may arise as a result of the election. This includes being available on Election Day to ensure all issues are addressed in a timely fashion.

  • Rand recognizes teachers for their work across the state

    In the early 1940s, a teacher in Arkansas decided that her profession deserved more recognition, so she gave herself an assignment: She wrote a letter to every governor and numerous other political and educational leaders, asking for their help.

    One of Mattie Whyte Woodridge’s letters eventually came to the attention of Eleanor Roosevelt, the former First Lady who not only agreed, but actually petitioned Congress to consider setting aside a day to honor those who teach.

  • Student newspapers in Kentucky are in crisis. We need them now more than ever.

    By TOM EBLEN

    Lexington Herald-Leader

    It is no secret America’s free press is under attack.

    Politicians now scream “fake news” whenever reporters expose their lies and misdeeds.

    Some broadcast networks and websites sow public distrust of honest journalism as they seek to build audiences by promoting tribalism and political ideologies.